What’s New In The Arts?


Published: March 24th, 2020

Online Learning & Arts Education Resources

Dear Arts Education Community,

March quickly turned from a focus on the celebration of dance, music, media arts, theatre, and visual arts in our schools to the navigation of a global health pandemic for the well-being of our students & communities. In the midst of all this, we need the arts and the ways they foster connection, joy, social critique, collaboration, and creativity more than ever.

As we navigate new ways of engaging with arts education, we wanted to share with you all some wonderful landing pages of resources that have emerged to support arts educators during this time. These include:

  • ADE Title IV-A‘s page for Online Learning & Enichment Resouces in Arts, Connectivity, EdTech, Health, PE, Professional Development, and Virtual Field Trips.
  • State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education‘s page of Arts Instructional Resources in the five artistic disciplines (Dance, Media Arts, Music, Theatre, and Visual Arts).
  • Arts Education Partnership‘s page for COVID19 Resources shared by partner organizations.

Additionally we are sharing the Arizona Department of Education‘s COVID19 Guidance page & The Arizona Commission on the ArtsCOVID19 Resources page for artists & arts organizations.

Above all please prioritize your own well-being during this time. In an NPR article describing Panic-gogy (Panic + Pedagogy) Robin DeRosa Director of the Open Learning & Teaching Collaborative at Plymouth State University describes this emerging educational pedagogy:

“The real skill that Panicgogy requires is sort of a critical compassion, if you will, the ability to look at the situation as it really is. Figure out what’s going on, how you can operate within that, and how you can be compassionate in that as well.”

Take good care of each other,

Dustin & Haley ADE Arts Education


Online Resources for Arts Educators

Title IV-A: Online Enrichment Learning Resources

These resources in Arts, EdTech, Health, and PE are to assist Teachers as they plan for non-traditional instruction including synchronous and asynchronous teaching and learning. Teachers – Please use your own discretion in what you select to use for your students.  These resources could compliment your current district adopted online resources.

For questions or to add to this site, please contact [email protected].

State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education: Arts Instructional Resources

The arts education community is working to build a repository of instructional resources for the field. The links within this page continue to be updated.
For questions about this site, please contact [email protected], SEADAE Wisconsin Member.

Arts Education Partnership: COVID-19 Resources

At the Arts Education Partnership, we’ve started to receive requests from our partners for additional resources that can help them shift operations to online platforms for telework situations, serve their constituents in new ways and care for their employeesIn response to these requests, we’ve engaged our partners in sharing resources they’ve created and compiled that may be useful to others as we navigate these new ways of working. 

To add to this page click here.


Arizona Department of Education

COVID19 Guidance to Schools

This page contains guidance and resources for Arizona’s public district and charter schools as they navigate COVID-19 response. The situation around COVID-19 is rapidly changing, so please continue to check this page for updates and guidance.


Arizona Commission on the Arts

COVID19 Resources

A collection of resources that may be relevant to you and/or the artists, arts professionals, and organizations . We will continue to update this page for as long as it may be useful.


 

Posted in Opportunities, What's New In The Arts? | Tagged , , , |
Published: January 14th, 2020

New Data Sheds Light on Access to Arts Education in Arizona Schools

access to arts education increases statewide but lags in rural, tribal, and low-income communities. 

According to a new report on access to arts education in Arizona public and charter schools during the 2017-2018 school year, access increased by 4% to 88% since the last published report. Over 130,000 students are estimated to remain without access to arts education.

Download the Full Executive Summary, One Page Highlights, or explore the Online Interactive Dashboard to learn more about who has access and who enrolls in arts education courses in Arizona Schools.


The Data

The data reflect both access (the presence of a course of instruction in at least one arts discipline) and participation (student enrollment).

Additionally, the analysis considers such variables as

  • school configuration (Elementary, Middle, or High School),
  • school type (traditional public or charter),
  • locale (urban, suburban, rural, etc., based on classification codes devised by National Center for Education Statistics)
  • Number of students who qualify for free and reduced-price lunch, and
  • School Majority Race/Ethnicity

Key Findings: Access to Arts Instruction

Access is the lowest threshold measure for arts education. It is used to determine if a school offers at least one arts discipline with any student enrollment. This only indicates presence of program, not breadth, and is used primarily to determine where schools may be operating without arts instruction.

  • While 88% of all students have access to some arts instruction, only 71% of students in grades K-8 had access to both Music and Art as requirement by state education code during the period covered by the report.
  • The number of students without access to arts instruction decreased 4% between 2015 and 2018.
  • The proportion of students without access to any arts courses was greatest in schools where more than 75% of students are eligible to receive Free/Reduced Price.
  • Student access to the two required arts disciplines (Art and Music) for elementary and middle schools (K-8) is lowest in schools where more than 75% of students receive Free/Reduced Price Lunch (69%).
  • While Public Schools represent 83% of the population they represent 60% of the “no arts” student population whereas Charter Schools represent 17% of the overall student population they hold 40% of the “no arts” students.

Key Findings: Participation in Arts Instruction

  • 71% of all students participated in arts education courses.
  • Music and Art are the most widely available of the arts disciplines and have the highest participation rates—45% and 52%, respectively—among the five artistic disciplines.
  • Student participation varies only slightly between Traditional schools and Charter schools. In traditional schools, 73% of students are enrolled in the arts as compared to 60% for Charter schools.

The following chart highlights where participation in arts education is highest and lowest based on specific characteristics:

Highest Arts Participation Rates Lowest Arts Participation Rates
High Poverty (Free Lunch Students 76%+) Mid-High Poverty (Free Lunch Students 51%-75%)
City (mid-size) City (small)
Majority Race/Ethnicity is White Majority Race/Ethnicity is American Indian
Traditional Public Schools Charter Schools
Elementary Schools High Schools

The full Executive Summary Report can be found at https://azarts.gov/azartsed-explorer/.


The Data Explorer Dashboard

Beyond the Executive Summary Report, Arizonans can explore the data through an easy-to-use interactive online dashboard at https://azarts.gov/azartsed-explorer/. With intuitive controls and myriad visualization options, this powerful tool allows users to venture deep into the data, following whatever path they choose, including statewide geographic comparisons; county-, district-, and school-level reporting, and year-over changes in enrollment, to name just a few.

According to Elisa Radcliffe, the Arts Commission’s Arts Learning Manager, “This tool provides a picture of where Arizona’s schools currently stand, allowing school leaders, parents and advocates to ensure that every child in Arizona can participate in the arts.”


Arizonans Respond

Among those taking a close look at the picture presented by the report is Joseph Benesh, Executive Director of Arizona Citizens for the Arts, a statewide advocacy network that partnered with AZ DOE and the Arts Commission to sponsor the research with funding from Americans for the Arts.

“Every study ever done reports the same data: children do better when the arts are a robust part of their education: they develop more self-confidence; they graduate at higher rates; they perform better in school and in life,” said Benesh, referring to data such as that reported by Americans for the Arts (https://bit.ly/2sQ0YHM) showing that students who took four years of arts and music classes while in high school scored an average of 92 points higher on their SATs than students who took only one-half year or less.

“I worry about the +/- 30% of our children who are missing out on those benefits. All of our children deserve better than a C grade in access to a well-rounded education,” said Benesh.

According to a survey conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs (https://bit.ly/34uKu4m) on behalf of Americans for the Arts in 2018, Arizonans feel very strongly about the value of arts education. 92% of Arizonans agree that the arts are part of a well-rounded education while 80% say the arts help students perform better academically.


Posted in Spotlight, State of the Arts, Uncategorized, What's New In The Arts? | Tagged , , , , |
Published: November 8th, 2019

Youth Arts Month Showcase: Call for Participation

This year the Arizona Department of Education and the Arizona Art Education Association are partnering to celebrate Youth Art Month (YAM) with a showcase during March & April. This collaboration will unveil ADE’s Brand New Student Art Gallery. We invite schools to submit student artworks to showcase in celebration of Youth Arts Month in the Arizona Department of Education’s Jefferson Building.

reception will be held Friday March 6th from 6-7:30pm at the Arizona Department of Education Jefferson Building to present awards in Elementary, Middle, and High School grade bands and to celebrate the excellent art education happening in Arizona Schools.

ADE Logo

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES 

  • Open to ALL public-school students grades K-12!
  • Each teacher may submit up to 2 student artworks per grade band K-4, 5-8, 9-12.
  • Frames will be provided by ADE sized 8×10, 9×12, 12×12, 11×14, 16×20, and 18×24.
  • Work must be be matted or mounted to one of these sizes on a black mat with artwork labels attached to the front and ready to be framed. Works not following these guidelines may not be eligible for display.

SUBMISSION PROCESS

  1. Fill out the ONLINE SUBMISSION FORM

http://www.azed.gov/artseducation/youth-arts-month-showcase/

and upload a signed Artwork-Photography Release form.

  1. Attach label to the front of the artwork.
  2. Drop off or mail submissions to The Office of Arts Education M-F 8-4:30pm. Drop off artwork by Friday January 10th at 4:30pm.

Attn: Haley Honeman

1535 W. Jefferson St.

Phoenix, Arizona 85007

 

Title I Districts/Charters may elect to also display submissions at the 2020 ESSA Conference.

Artworks will be displayed Mon. March 2nd– Fri. April 24th at the Department of Education.

Artworks are available for retrieval Monday April 27th– Friday May 8th at drop off location.

Questions? Contact Haley Honeman [email protected]

The Council for Art Education administers Youth Art Month (YAM) at the national level to showcase the positive impact and association between art teachers and students. YAM promotes visual art education for all K – 12 students and encourages funding for quality school art programs.

Download this flyer here: YAM Showcase Flyer

Posted in Arts Associations Updates, Opportunities, Spotlight, State of the Arts, Uncategorized, What's New In The Arts? | Tagged , , |
Published: November 1st, 2019

2019 Biosecurity Poster Contest Winners Announced

 

The ASU Biodesign Institute honored 25 students on Tuesday October 29th 2019 in a reception for the Biosafety Poster Competition. This year’s 2019 Biodesign Poster Contest participants recieved awards in four categories for posters illustrating their understanding of Biosecurity and Biosafety. Winning students came from Porter Elementary School, Northwest Christian School and Chaparral Elementary School. For a complete list of winners see the list below. Congratulations to this year’s winners of the 2019 Biosecurity Poster Contest!

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What does Biosafety Mean?

  • Third Place Winners: Olivia Jodray & Chance Wickham, Porter Elementary School
  • Second Place Winners: Ameire Auguste, Sophia Ciganick & Ashton Neal, Porter Elementary School
  • First Place Winners: Torrey Klein, Sophie Mendoza, & Ariel Gordon, Porter Elementary School

Germ Prevention

  • Third Place Winner: Brisbane Bushbaum, Northwest Christian School
  • Second Place Winner: Sarah Beth Engle, Northwest Christian School
  • First Place Winner: Hannah Sabo, Northwest Christian School

Wash Your Hands

  • Third Place Winner: Reese Hunt, Northwest Christian School
  • Second Place Winner: Lila Sands, Northwest Christian School
  • First Place Winners: Gillian Bauer, Northwest Christian School

Staying Healthy Tips

  • Third Place Winner: Presley Davy, Northwest Christian School
  • Second Place Winner: Ella Bridges, Northwest Christian School
  • First Place Winners: Ephriam Graves, Xavier Jackson, Tyler Shad, Porter Elementary School

Honorable Mentions

  • Germ Prevention: Maecyn Huizinga & Sarah Jakubowski Northwest Christian
  • Staying Healthy Tips: Luke Perales & Bentley Kavlie, Northwest Christian
  • What does Biosafety Mean?: Alexis Encinas, Chaparral School

Grand Prize Winners

  • Torrey Klein, Sophie Mendoza & Ariel Gordon, Porter Elementary School

 

Posted in Spotlight, Uncategorized, What's New In The Arts? |
Published: October 28th, 2019

Applications Open for the Arizona State Seal of Arts Proficiency

At the State Board of Education meeting on Monday October 28th 2019, rulemaking closed on the State Seal of Arts Proficiency R7-2-321SB1111 was signed into law May 14, 2019 and has been officially adopted by the State Board of Education to award high school graduates who meet minimum pathway requirements with a diploma seal of arts proficiency.

In tandem with announcing the adoption by the State Board of Education, The Department of Education’s Office of Arts Education is launching a website to the support the State’s Administration of the State Seal of Arts Proficiency.

http://www.azed.gov/artseducation/arizona-state-seal-of-arts-proficiency/

The Arizona State Seal of Arts Proficiency website includes guidance and resources for LEAs to explore the seal’s background, objectives, pathway requirements, and examples of procedures to administer the seal at the local level. LEAs who wish to administer the State Seal of Arts Proficiency in the 19-20 school year must apply by 5pm MST on Friday November 22nd. LEAs will be notified of their status by 5pm MST Friday December 20th. LEAs who are approved to administer the seal will submit an LEA Seal Achievement Report by April 15th 2020, and will receive diploma seals for qualifying graduates no later than May 1st 2020.

An exciting aspect of the Arizona State Seal of Arts Proficiency implementation is the “Call for Student Designers”! The website includes a link where interested student artists can upload an original design. Arts Education Stakeholders will determine which design will become the official seal that will be affixed to qualifying student diplomas.

If you have any questions about how your LEA may participate in administering the State Seal of Arts Proficiency, please email [email protected].

Posted in Arts Associations Updates, Opportunities, Spotlight, State of the Arts, Uncategorized, What's New In The Arts? | Tagged , , , |
Published: September 19th, 2019

Call for Student Voice at the 2020 ESSA Conference

The 2020 ESSA Conference “Educating the Whole Child” at the We Ko Pa Conference and Resort Center February 19-21 is seeking to feature student performers and panelists to highlight examples of well-rounded education in the state. Fill out an application to showcase student voice in one of the following two ways:

Student Performance Group: Student performance groups will showcase 15 minute performances during whole group sessions, breaks in programming, or at close of conference day for over 500 educational leaders from through out the state.

Student STEM/STEAM Panelists: Student STEM/STEAM panelists will co-present a 10 minute break outsession on a panel with an educator that highlights integrated learning in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math.

More information below. To apply visit the Arts Education Student Opportunities Page and fill out an application.

Application Timeline:

  • Submit the ONLINE APPLICATION by Friday November 22th at 5pm MST
  • Applicants will be notified of their status by Friday December 6th 5pm MST

Questions? Email [email protected]


2020 ESSA Call for Featured Student Performances

Highlight the ways your school provides students with access to a well-rounded education through the arts. The Arizona Department of Education is seeking featured student performances for the 2020 ESSA Conference February 19-21 at the We Ko Pa Resort Conference Center. We are looking to feature student performance groups in theatre, dance, or music.

Featured students will present their work at the We Ko Pa Resort and Conference Center preceding or following a whole group session, during a scheduled break, or at the close of the event day.

Past performance groups have included:

  • Contemporary Rock Bands
  • Concert Choirs
  • Modern Dance Ensembles
  • Mariachi Performances
  • Orchestras
  • Solo Performers
  • Bands
  • A Capella Choirs

Application requirements:

  • Arizona District or Charter School
  • Performance selections should not exceed 15 minutes in length

For more information see the ESSA 2020 Call for Featured Student Performances.


2020 ESSA Call for Student STEM/STEAM Panel Presentations

Highlight an integrated, hands-on student learning project at your school! The Arizona Department of Education is seeking student presentations for a panel on STEM & STEAM education at the 2020 ESSA Conference February 19-21 at the We Ko Pa Resort and Conference Center.

STEAM Education is an integrated approach to teaching Sciences, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics.

Application requirements:

  • Arizona District or Charter School
  • Presentations 10 Minutes in length
  • Teacher and 2-3 students
  • Feature STEM & STEAM Learning

For more information see the ESSA 2020 Call for Featured Student Performances.

 

Posted in Opportunities, Spotlight, Uncategorized, What's New In The Arts? | Tagged , , , , , |
Published: September 12th, 2019

Celebrate National Arts in Education Week with Technology

Today in celebration of National Arts in Education Week, Erin Henderson, Title IV-A Digital Learning Specialist, shares resources & inspiration for integrating technology into the five artistic disciplines: Music, Media Arts, Theater, and Visual Arts.

“Artists can share their work better than ever before by incorporating technology into performances and art and utilizing technology to market their skills and create a digital portfolio. Arts educators can introduce technology tools to streamline classes, create student portfolios, and communicate with students and their families. If you are looking for inspiration and ideas on how to integrate technology into your arts classroom and build your student’s digital literacy in the process, check out some of the resources compiled below. Take your arts classroom to the next level! Collaborate with technology and computer science teachers! ”

Dance: 

Dance Choreography Improves Girls’ Computational Skills Clemson University studies how dance choreography can improve girls’ computation skills and help them understand coding and programming. This is a way to increase representation of girls and women in STEM fields.  

danceLogic: This 14-week program teachers girls ages 13-18 how to dance and code, as well as teamwork, dedication, and focus. Watch the CBSNews coverage of this wonderful community program.  

Dance Party Code Tutorial from Code.org:Students learn to code their very own dance party in under one hour! Teachers can also utilize theDance Party Unplugged lesson as an introduction the Hour of Code tutorial, or as a standalone activity if you do not have technology available. 

Extension Activity: 

  •  Students can share their Dance Party Code video with the rest of the class, using a website like Padlet.  
  • After they code their dance, they can perform their code live for the rest of the class.  

Media Arts: 

Media arts and technology go hand-in-hand. Students can use technology to take and edit photos, create films, code websites, apps, and video games, create interactive simulations and digital arts, and really, the possibilities are endless. New technologies are creating entirely new art fields and university programs.   

How Technology Continues to Change the Film Industry: Part of the “Every Job is a STEAM job” series from Ozobot, this blog describes how technology plays a vital and changing role in the film industry and why all film students should be learning technology.  

Music 

Composing Code: Why Musicians Make Great Software Developers: All the things that make musicians great, are the same things that make them excellent coders; they are analytical, logical, and methodical with the ability to recognize and manipulate patterns.  

How Technology is Changing Music Education: Tim Topham hosts Simon Rushby on his podcast that discusses how technology is changing music education, including the flipped classroom, making the best use of students’ smartphones, and the best apps to use in your classroom.  

Music Lesson Tips: Lauma Kazaka offers practical approaches and programs to integrate technology into your music classroom.  

Tech in the Music Classroom Creates Efficiencies, Improves Accessibility: Meghan Bogardus Cortez discusses how technology can be utilized in a meaningful way in music classrooms, from 3D printing custom musical instruments, apps to help students compose, and creating links between music, coding, and computational thinking.  

Theater: 

How Technology is Changing Theater Design: Part of the “Every Job is a STEAM job” series from Ozobot, this blog describes how technology is changing theater design and why all theater students should be using technology. 

Technology in the Theater Classroom: The Drama Teacher Podcast discusses tools, tips, and tricks to incorporate technology into the Theater classroom. Many of these tools can be utilized in other arts’ classrooms as well. 

The Top 25 BFA Theatre Design & Tech Programs: Technology is critical to Theater Design. Explore 25 college degree programs the integrate theater, design, and technology.  

Visual Arts: 

Bringing Technology into the Visual Arts Classroom- Watch Mr. Leichnitz utilize technology in his Graffiti Art project.  

The Visual Arts and Technology- Students are using technology in their everyday lives to create and produce art. This article briefly discusses how visual arts teachers can harness this interest in their classrooms.  

10 Ways Technology can Enhance the Art RoomWynita Harmon guides readers through 10 ways teachers can utilize technology to enhance the traditional art room.  

What is the Perfect Balance of Technology in the Art Room?– Middle School art teacher Tracy Hare discusses the perfect balance of technology in the art room. Too little and your students miss out on the opportunity to develop the 4 C’s (creativity, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. Too much and your students miss out on the benefits of a traditional arts classroom.  

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Email [email protected] with questions or requests for more information on how to build students’ digital literacy in your arts classroom.

Posted in Spotlight, Uncategorized, What's New In The Arts? | Tagged , , , |
Published: September 9th, 2019

ARIZONA CELEBRATES 2019 ARTS IN EDUCATION WEEK

Happy National Arts in Education Week! September 8-14th 2019

Arts Education has a huge impact on Arizonans! From providing us with vibrate, creative public spaces to enjoy, to providing students with supportive, caring environments to explore their self expression, to laying the foundation for the future of the creative industries sector– it is clear that arts education deeply matters.

Since 2010, House Resolution 275 has designated the week beginning the second Sunday in September as National Arts in Education Week. During this week, the field of arts education joins together to tell the story of the impact and power of the arts in education.

This year ADE’s Office of Arts Education, Arizona Citizens for the Arts, Act One, The Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture, and the Arizona Commission on the Arts asked for videos telling your stories of how arts education impacts the lives of Arizonans. The #BecauseofArtsEd2019 video below resulted from your responses.

It’s not too late to add your story on social media during Arts in Education Week about the impact Arts Education had on your life using the hashtag #BecauseofArtsEd! How are you celebrating National Arts in Education Week? Take pictures of celebration events and tag them with the hashtag #ArtsEdWeek. What’s going on in Arizona? Tag your Arizona events with the hashtag #AZArtsEd!

Stay tuned for more exciting updates this week from ADE’s Office of Arts Education to celebrate 2019 National Arts in Education Week.

Posted in Opportunities, Spotlight, State of the Arts, What's New In The Arts? | Tagged , , |