Frequently Asked Questions

Health & Nutrition Operations

When are claims due?

All claims are due by the 10th day of each month. If the 10th falls on a weekend or holiday, then claims are due the following workday.

When are reimbursement checks issued?

Reimbursement checks are issued no later than the end of the month for valid claims submitted online by the 10th of the month.

What if I cannot submit my claim because my Internet access is down?

Then submit your claim as soon as possible. If you cannot submit it by the 10th of the month, please contact Health and Nutrition Services Division at (602) 542-8700

What is ADE Common Logon?

It’s the main security database that is used for Health and Nutrition Services’ online applications.

How do I get access to Common Logon?

Submit a completed Common Logon Permissions form, signed by a designated official, to the correct Health and Nutrition Services Division Unit.

Who do I call when I forget my User ID and password for CNP Web?

Contact Health and Nutrition Services Division at (602)542-8700 and ask to speak with the corresponding Common Logon Unit Contact.

  • National School Lunch Program
  • Child and Adult Food Care Program (CACFP)/ Family Day Care Homes (FDCH)
  • Summer Food Service Program

 

How can I find out if my check was mailed?

Check the CNP Web claims index page for desired claim month. If your status shows “Submitted for Payment” then your check will be mailed within 10 to 15 days after its “Submitted to Accounting” date.

Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

Who is eligible to participate in CACFP?

All of the following:

  1. Child care centers or preschools
  2. Adult daycare centers
  3. Head Starts
  4. Emergency shelters
  5. At-risk afterschool snack programs or outside school hours programs
  6. Daycare homes

How do you apply to participate in the CACFP?

You must attend the How to Apply for the CACFP training course. You can register online at: http://www.ade.az.gov/onlineregistration. During training you will receive an electronic application packet that must be submited within 45 days of attending the training.

Where can I find recordkeeping forms for CACFP?

All recordkeeping forms for child care centers are available at  www.azed.gov/health-nutrition/cacfp//child and all recordkeeping forms for adult care centers are available at www.azed.gov/health-nutrition/cacfp/adult-care-centers/.

I already participate in the CACFP but I would like to add an additional site. How do I do this?

If the new site is not part of the same legal entity as the participating center, you must apply as if you are a new sponsor. If the new site is part of the same legal entity as the participating center, you will need to do the following:

  1. Provide program training to all the new staff.
  2. Collect income affidavits for all children or adult enrolled in the new site (not applicable for head starts, emergency, shelters, or at-risk afterschool snack programs).
  3. Update your current application and management plan to include the new site and submit to ADE.
  4. Conduct a pre-approval visit at the new site using the Child or Adult Care Center Monitoring Evaluation Form. This must be submitted to ADE. Please contact your assigned specialist or the Specialist of the Day for technical assistance on monitoring requirements for centers with multiple sites.
  5. Complete a hard copy site application and submit to ADE.
  6. Submit a copy of the new site’s current DHS license
  7. Complete a Sponsor & Site – Add/Change/Delete form and submit to ADE.

ATTENTION HEAD STARTS: You must first go to www.ade.az.gov/schoolfinance/FAQs/CTDS_District and read the instructions and complete a form for each site being added. After the forms are processed, you may follow the instructions above.

What are the benefits of CACFP?

Institutions that participate in the CACFP receive reimbursement to enhance their current menus to offer more fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and low fat dairy products. This increases the health and nutritional status of children and adults enrolled while enforcing good eating habits. The additional reimbursement also helps to keep the cost of tuition at more affordable levels.

I am a daycare home provider. How can I apply to participate in the program?

Daycare home providers may participate under the auspices of a non-profit or public agency called a sponsoring organization. These organizations are responsible for the training, monitoring, and implementation of the Program. For a list of currently participating sponsoring organizations go to Requirements for Participation – FDCH and click on the link for “Family Daycare Home Sponsoring Organizations.”

What meals are reimbursable?

Institutions are reimbursed for two meals and a snack or two snacks and a meal per day per eligible participant.

Emergency shelters may be reimbursed for up to three meals per day per eligible child.

At-Risk Afterschool Programs may be reimbursed for one snack and one supper per day per eligible child.

What are the meal pattern requirements?

Breakfast must include a milk component, a grain component, and a fruit or vegetable component.

Lunch/Supper must include a milk component, a grain component, a meat or meat alternate component, and a fruit and vegetable component from two different sources.

Snacks must include two of the following four components: milk, grain, meat or meal alternate, and fruit or vegetable.

High sugars must be limited to two times per week and may only be served at breakfast and/or snack time. High fat items must be limited to two times per week.

More CACFP FAQ’s

Child Care/Family Centers and Homes


Adult Care Centers


After School Programs


Emergency Shelters


What are the eligibility requirements for participation in the CACFP?

For day care homes:

  • Provide care for no more than 6 children, 4 of which are for compensation, or no more than the license capacity approved by DHS.

For child care centers:

  • For-Profit centers must have at least 25% of enrollment or license capacity, whichever is less, receive Title XX funds under the Social Security Act
  • Non-profit centers must have tax-exempt status and be able to provide documentation of IRS 501(c)(3).

How do I get reimbursed for meals served to children?

In day care homes:

  • Reimbursement rate is based on income eligibility of the geographical area or household income.

In child care centers:

  • A claiming percentage is established for each center based on the income level and household size of each enrolled child/adult.

How are providers paid?

  • On a daily basis, providers keep a record of attendance and a menu of meals provided to children. They submit this regularly to their Sponsoring organization. The Sponsor will calculate and verifies all meals served and submits a claim form to the State Agency for reimbursement. The State Agency then issues a check to the Sponsor for the meals. The Sponsoring Organization will then issue a check to the provider.

Can infant meals be reimbursed on the CACFP?

  • Yes, reimbursable meals for infants may contain either breast milk or iron-fortified infant formula, or both, supplied by the caregiver or by the parent. However, to receive reimbursement, the caregiver must always offer the infant a complete, developmentally appropriate meal. Because we are recognizing the labor involved in serving meals to infants, the meal must be served and fed to the infant by the caregiver.

Can the milk used in the preparation of products such as pudding, cream sauces and ice cream count toward the milk requirement?

  • No. The milk served must be served as a beverage and/or poured over cereal at breakfast or snack.

Can mixed fruits/vegetables in dishes such as stew or gelatin salad be counted as meeting the two or more requirement for fruits and vegetables?

  • No. When used in a dish or casserole, the mixed fruits/vegetables are counted as one component.

Can providers claim own children?

    • Provider’s own children and under what circumstances children qualify to be claimed:
      • Is the provider’s household/economic unit income eligible for Tier I?
      • Is the child part of the provider’s household or economic unit?
      • Does the child reside in the home for extended periods of time?
      • Does the provider have actual custodial care for the child (regardless of the child relationship or legal status relative to the provider)
      • In the case of custodial care, is the period of time indefinite?
      • Is the child enrolled and participating in the CACFP during the time of meal service?
      • Are there nonresidential enrolled children present and participating in the meal service?

If the answer to each of these questions is YES, the child(ren) is (are) eligible as provider’s own. On the other hand, if any of the answers are NO, the provider cannot claim meals served to this (these) child(ren).


What are the eligibility requirements for adult day care centers participating in the CACFP?

  • For-Profit centers must have at least 25% of enrollment or license capacity, whichever is less, receive Title XIX funds under the Social Security Act
  • Non-profit centers must have tax-exempt status and be able to provide documentation of IRS 501(c)(3).

How do I get on the Program?

  • Applications are distributed in the workshop and instruction is provided on how to complete and submit the application.

What are the age requirements for participants?

  • Reimbursement may be claimed for meals served to functionally impaired adults or adults age 60 and older

What are the meal requirements for reimbursement?

  • In order for a meal to be eligible for reimbursement, centers must meet the CACFP meal pattern requirements and keep all required documentation.

How is the blended rate for meal reimbursement determined?

  • The blended is based on a 30-day collection period during which income applications are taken for all adults in care.

What are the eligibility requirements for after school sites participating in the CACFP?

  • After school sites must be located with in the attendance area of a school in which 50 percent or more of the children enrolled are eligible for free or reduced price meals.
  • Programs must provide children with regularly scheduled activities in a structured and supervised environment. The program must also include educational or enrichment activities.
  • In addition, For-Profit centers must have at least 25% of enrollment or license capacity, whichever is less, receive Title XIX funds under the Social Security Act
  • Non-profit centers must have tax-exempt status and be able to provide documentation of IRS 501(c)(3).

Is licensing required for after school sites participating in the CACFP?

  • No. Eligible after school care programs do not need to be licensed in order to participate in CACFP unless there is a State or local requirement for licensing. If there is no State or local requirement, then programs must meet State and local health and safety standards.

Are meals served on weekends eligible for reimbursement?

  • Yes. Snacks may be reimbursed if they are served on weekends, holiday, or vacation periods that occur during the regular school year. Snacks served during summer vacation are not eligible for reimbursement.

What are the record keeping requirements for after school sites participating in the CACFP?

  • Programs must keep the following records:
    1. Meal Counts
    2. Attendance Records
    3. Menus and Menu Production Records

What are the age requirements for participants in after school programs?

  • Reimbursement may be claimed for snacks served to all children through the age of 18 in eligible after school programs. Reimbursement may also be claimed for those children who turn 19 during the school year.

What are the eligibility requirements for emergency shelters participating in the CACFP?

  • In order to be eligible for participation in CACFP, emergency shelters must:
    1. Provide temporary residence to children and their parents or guardians, and;
    2. Serve meals in a congregate setting.

Is licensing required for emergency shelters participating in the CACFP?

  • No. Emergency shelters do not need to be licensed in order to participate in CACFP, nor do they have to offer formal child care in order to be eligible for CACFP reimbursement. However,programs must meet State and local health and safety standards.

Are meals served on weekends eligible for reimbursement?

  • Yes. Meals and snacks served year round are eligible for reimbursement in emergency shelters.

What are the record keeping requirements for emergency shelters participating in the CACFP?

  • Programs must keep the following records:
    1. Meal Counts
    2. Attendance Records
    3. Menus and Menu Production Records

What are the age requirements for participants in emergency shelters?

  • Reimbursement may be claimed for meals and snacks served to all children through the age of 12 who are residing in the shelter. Migrant children age 15 and younger and children with disabilities regardless of age may also receive CACFP meals and snacks at the emergency shelters where they reside.

How do I add a new site?

The sponsor must conduct the following:

    1. Train all staff on CACFP job duties prior to participation.
    2. Conduct a CACFP enrollment (income affidavits, claiming rosters, etc.).
    3. Conduct a pre-approval (monitoring) visit prior to adding the site.
    4. Complete and submit hard-copy site application(s).
    5. Complete an Add-Change-Delete form.
    6. Update and submit your revised Application and Management plan.
    7. Submit a copy of the new site license.
    8. Update training and monitoring plans.
    9. Complete and submit the online CNPWEB site application.

These may be faxed to: (602) 542-3818, or mailed to:

The Arizona Department of Education
Child & Adult Care Food Program, Bin # 7
1535 W. Jefferson Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007

Once the forms have been received in our office, an online CNP Web Site Application will be created, submitted and approved. Upon completion of the newly approved Site Application, the Sponsoring Organization is responsible for maintaining the online Site Application and submitting any changes or updates for future approval.

CACFP New Meal Pattern

If a center or day care home is open less than 5 days per week, can they still serve a meat/meat alternate in place of the grains component three times per week?

Yes.  All centers and day care homes have the option to serve meat/meat alternates in place of the grain component at breakfast three times per week, no matter how many days per week they are open.  This includes centers and day care homes that are open more than 5 days per week.

Can a center or day care home use a meat/meat alternate to meet a portion of the grains component at breakfast, such as half the grains component?

A meat/meat alternate may only be used to meet the entire grains requirement at breakfast a maximum of three times per week.  Serving a meat/meat alternate to meet only a portion of the grains component would increase complexity and monitoring challenges.  Specifically, it would be impractical to serve very small quantities of meat/meat alternates to children 1 through 5 years old because those age groups’ grain component serving size is already very small.

Are vended meals with deep-fried foods allowed?

While deep-fat frying is not allowed as a way of preparing foods on-site, vended meals are not considered to be prepared on-site. Therefore, a center may claim a vended meal that contains deep-fried foods as long as the deep-fried food was prepared by the vendor off-site.

If a center or day care home only serves one meal per day, does the grain have to be whole grain-rich every day?

Yes.  If a center or day care home only serves one meal per day (breakfast, lunch or supper), then the grain served at that meal must be whole grain-rich to meet with the whole grain-rich requirement.  When a meat/meat alternate is served in place of the grains component at breakfast (allowed a maximum of three times per week)., and the center or day care home only serves that one meal per day, a whole grain-rich item does not need to be served.

Can a center or day care home use food or beverages as a reward or punishment in certain circumstances?

Centers and day care homes may not use a reimbursable meal, or components of a reimbursable meal, as a way to reward or punish a child or adult participant under any circumstance.  For example, if a day care home is helping to potty train a child in their care, they cannot withhold a reimbursable meal or snack from the child as a punishment.  Additionally, the day care home cannot offer the child a certain food or beverage as a reward for potty training.  For example, the day care home cannot say the child will get juice at snack if he or she uses the bathroom.

Can meals that are prepared in a central, satellite kitchen, contain deep-fried foods?

Meals served at centers where the meal is prepared at a central, satellite kitchen cannot contain a deep-fried food and be claimed for reimbursement.  However, CACFP centers with meals prepared at central, satellite kitchens may still purchase and serve foods that are pre-fried, flash-fried, or par-fried by the manufacturer, such as fried fish sticks or potato wedges.  But, a central, satellite kitchen must reheat these foods using a method other than deep-fat frying.

For adult meals, can yogurt be served in place of milk at multiple meals in one day if the center uses offer versus serve (OVS)?

Regardless of the type of meal service used, an adult day care center can only serve yogurt in place of fluid milk once per day. The yogurt limitation applies to the served meals, not what the adult participant selects or consumes.  It is important to remember that yogurt cannot be counted towards the fluid milk component and the meat alternate component during the same meal.  However, yogurt may be served in place of fluid milk at one meal and served as a meat alternate in another meal on the same day.

When a mother is unable to express enough breastmilk to meet the minimum fluid milk requirements, does whole unflavored milk have to be served as a supplement to meet the requirement?

Yes.  If a mother chooses to continue breastfeeding her child after 1 year of age, but is unable to provide enough expressed breastmilk to meet the fluid milk requirement, then whole unflavored milk must be served to the child to make up the difference and meet the minimum milk requirement for a 1 year old.  The two milks do not need to be mixed in the same cup.  As a reminder, the center or day care home must provide all the other meal components in order for the meal to be reimbursable.

Is “Original” soy milk considered flavored soy milk?

Original soy milk is considered unflavored soy milk.  Under the updated meal patterns, children 1 through 5 years old may only be served unflavored milk and unflavored non-dairy beverages.  Because original soy milk is considered unflavored, it may be served to participants of any age that are unable to consume fluid milk due to a special dietary need, as long as it is nutritionally equivalent to cown’s milk per the nutrition standards outlined in 7 CFR 226.20(g)(3).

Can flavored milk powder be added to unflavored (plain) milk?

For children 1 through 5 years old, flavored milk powder may not be added to unflavored milk.  Similar to syrup, adding flavored milk powder to unflavored milk turns the unflavored milk into flavored milk.  Flavored milk cannot be part of a reimbursable meal for children ages 1 through 5 years old.

For children 6 years old and older and adults, flavored milk powder may be added to fat-free (skim) unflavored milk.  However, flavored milk powder may not be added to plain low-fat (1%) milk and served as part of a reimbursable meal.  This is because only flavored fat-free milk is allowed for children 6 years old and older and adults under the updated meal patterns.

How much meat/meat alternate must be served to meet the grain component at breakfast meals?

When serving a meat/meat alternate in place of the grains component at breakfast, one ounce of meat/meat alternate is equal to one serving of grains or one ounce equivalent of grains.  Starting October 1, 2019, all grains must be credited based on ounce equivalents (oz eq).  As a reminder a meat/meat alternate may be served in place of the entire grains component at breakfast a maximum of three times per week.

Are soy products such as edamame, tempeh and soy cheese allowed?

Some soy products may be creditable under the CACFP meal patterns.  For example edamame and soy nuts (including soy nut butter) may count as a meat alternate.  But, tempeh, seitan, and soy cheese are not creditable.

Can a center or day care home rely on the Nutrition Facts Label alone to evaluate a meat alternate, such as a soy burger or tofu sausage?

When serving processed tofu products (such as links and sausages made from tofu), as meat alternates in a reimbursable meal, the tofu must contain the required 5 grams of protein per 2.2 ounces by weight or 1/4 cup by volume.  However, the protein content of the additional ingredients in the processed tofu product is also included on the Nutrition Facts Label.  Therefore the Nutrition Facts Label is not sufficient documentation to indicate that a meat alternate lice a soy burger or tofu sausage meets the protein requirement.  This information would need to be obtained from the manufacturer.

Is soft tofu that is cut up into cubes and served on a salad creditable?

Yes.  Pieces of tofu, including firm and soft, that are easily identifiable may credit towards the meat alternate component in the CACFP and the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs (School Meal Program).  In both the CACFP and School Meal Programs, 2.2 ounces (1/4 cup) of commercially prepared tofu, containing at least 5 grams of protein, is creditable as 1.0 ounce equivalent meat alternate.

However, items that mimic another food group (such as tofu noodles which mimic a grain noodle) are not creditable because the tofu is not easily recognizable as a meat alternate.  The meals served through the CACFP and School Meal Programs provide an opportunity for children to learn how to build a healthy plate.  Therefore, it is important that children can easily recognize the foods served as part of a food group that contributes to a healthy meal.

What is the difference between breakfast cereal and ready-to-eat cereal?

Breakfast cereal is a broad term defined by the Food and Drug Administration as including ready-to-eat and instant and regular hot cereals, such as oatmeal (21CFR170.3(n)(4)). Some examples of ready-to-each cereals are puffed rice cereals, whole grain o’s, and granola. While ready-to-eat cereal is always a breakfast cereal, a breakfast cereal is not always a ready-to-eat cereal.

FNS uses the terms “breakfast cereals” and “ready-to-eat cereals” in guidance because of this distinction. For example, only ready-to-eat cereals are allowed at snack under the infant meal pattern, but all breakfast cereals served in the CACFP must contain no more than 6 grams of sugar per dry ounce.

If a center or day care home makes homemade granola, how can they determine if it meets the sugar limit for breakfast cereals?

When making homemade granola, a center or day care home must calculate the sugar content of the granola based on the recipe they use. the provider should keep the recipe on file to demonstrate the granola meets the breakfast cereal sugar limit if asked during a review.

Can a provider mix a high sugar cereal with a low sugar cereal to meet the sugar limit?

While it is generally acceptable to mix creditable food items together, such as in a smoothie, providers may not mix a non-creditable food item with a creditable food item to make a new food item creditable. For example, a provider cannot mix a cereal with 8 grams of sugar per dry ounce with a cereal with 4 grams of sugar per dry ounce to create a cereal that has 6 grams of sugar per dry ounce (the sugar limit for breakfast cereals). Another example that is not allowed is mixing yogurts to create a yogurt that has no more than 23 grams of sugar per 6 ounces.

May non-profit food service account funds be used to purchase grain-based desserts?

CACFP centers or day care homes may not use Program funds to purchase non-creditable foods.  Starting October 1, 2017, grain-based desserts are not creditable in the CACFP. The one exception to this policy is condiments, herbs and spices.  While condiments, herbs and spices cannot credit towards the meal pattern requirements, condiments served with creditable foods and herbs and spices used to prepare and enhance the flavor of meals may be purchased with non-profit food service account funds.

Are crusts on savory pies, such as chicken pot pie, allowed?

Yes. Crusts on meat/meat alternate (savory) pies, such as a chicken pot pie, may credit towards the grains component if it contains at least 1/4 serving grain per portion.

Are scones and puddings considered grain-based desserts?

Sweet scones, sweet bread puddings, and rice puddings are considered grain-based desserts and cannot count towards the grain component.  Similar to crackers, scones can be considered savory or sweet.  Savory scones, such as ones made with cheese and herbs, credit like a biscuit and are not considered grain-based desserts.  However, sweet scones, such as those made with fruit and icing, credit like a cookie and are considered grain-based desserts.

Bread puddings can also be savory or sweet.  Sweet bread puddings, such as one made with chocolate chips, is considered a grain-based dessert.  However, savory bread puddings, such as one made with spinach or mushrooms, are not considered grain-based desserts.

Menu planners should consider the common perception of the food item and whether it is thought of as a dessert when deciding to serve it.

Does yogurt have to be low-fat or fat-free to credit in the CACFP?

There is no fat restriction for yogurt.  Centers and day care homes may choose to serve whole-fat, reduced-fat, low-fat, or fat-free yogurt.  However, as a best practice, centers and day care homes are encouraged to serve low-fat or fat-free yogurt.  This is consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans which recommends consuming low-fat or fat-free dairy products (such as milk, yogurt and cheese) as part of a healthy eating pattern for children 2 years old and older and adults.

Can centers and day care homes serve flavored water?

Yes.  Centers and day care homes may choose to flavor water with vegetables, fruit, or herbs as long as plain, potable water is also available.  However, commercially flavored water is not allowed.  Please keep in mind that any vegetables or fruits added to the water cannot count towards the vegetable or fruit component of a meal, including snacks.  In addition, food safety can be a concern when flavoring water on-site with cut-up vegetables, fruits and herbs.  Therefore, centers and day care homes need to make sure they are following all State and local health and sanitation codes.

Food Distribution Program

My School will be closed on the next delivery date shown on my order form, how can I change the date?

You can select a different date when you create your next shipment from the available dates listed. If your shipment has already been created go to the Shipment Calendar tab, click on List View, find the shipment you would like to date change and click on the Edit option. Use the drop down box and select the New Delivery Date and click on the Calendar Icon to save the date.

Who is eligible for the USDA School Foods Program?

Approved sponsors of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) may be eligible to participate in the USDA School Foods Program.

How do I get started using the USDA School Foods Program?

Approved sponsors of the NSLP and SFSP* federal meal programs may participate in the USDA Foods Program. *Participation deadlines exist for SFSP

  1. Visit the USDA Foods webpage http://www.azed.gov/health-nutrition/food-distribution/ or contact ADE School Food Programs at 602-542-8700 or [email protected]
  2. Complete “delivery-destination-form-sy17” and return to [email protected] or Fax 602-542-3818 and be sure to address with the following: “Attn. School Food Programs”
  3. Complete and submit US Foods Credit Application
  4. Request access to myFOODS, the USDA Foods online distribution system by attending training https://ems.azed.gov keyword USDA Foods or myFOODS

When can I request Surplus and what is the process?

Surplus is available in the Surplus Catalog based on State Account quantities and may not be accessible every day. Requests can be submitted for the materials by all active agencies, with or without available entitlement.  Surplus Catalog requests are processed on a first come, first serve basis generally within 24 hours during the workweek.  To request Surplus, refer to your myFOODS Training Manual (Product Catalogs) in the Documents section.

What happens if I miss my ‘MUST SHIP BY DATE’?

All products past the ‘Must Ship by Date’ will simply fall off of your ‘Available Material’ page and will be put back into Surplus. Excess Storage Fees will NOT be applied to your agency.

How do I know when materials have been received at the State warehouse and are available for me to schedule a shipment?

Under My Shipments, look at the Available Materials tab. If any material is in White, it has been received at the State warehouse and is available to create a shipment.  Check the Date Received at US Foods to see what date it was received.  If the material is in Yellow it has not been received at the State warehouse, check the column USDA Shipping Period for an estimated date of when this material should arrive.  A schedule for anticipated shipments is located in the Documents section under 2017 Brown Box Calendar SY17.

USDA Foods Processing

When are the processing diversions completed each year?

The USDA Foods Program creates the processing catalogs in January of each year. Recipient agencies (RA’s) must submit catalog requisitions by February/March. ADE then compiles requisition results and places truck orders with USDA in March/April.

Who is eligible to participate in USDA Foods Processing?

Any Recipient Agency (RA) participating in the USDA Foods Program.

How much time is allotted to process USDA Foods into end products for recipient agencies?

The time frame for processing raw, bulk USDA Foods into end products is a maximum of 17 months. This begins on July 1st of the new school year up to November 30th of the following school year.

Example: A recipient agency (RA) diverts 1,000 pounds of raw, bulk USDA Foods to a processor for SY17. During SY17, RA processes 750 pounds. The RA has until November 30th of the following SY18 to process the remaining 250 pounds diverted in SY17.

 

When are the processing surveys available and completed each year?

Food Distribution under School Food Programs establishes the surveys in January of each year. All processing surveys are due in February by recipient agencies where ADE compiles survey results into truckloads to place orders with USDA in March.

To process a case of end product, how many pounds of USDA Foods does it take?

This information can be found in the USDA Foods Web-Based Ordering System – myFOODS, under Documents. Select the manufacturer’s SEPDS and reference column F (DF Inventory Drawdown per case) which states the amount of raw bulk USDA Foods it takes to make one case of that end product.

Does entitlement pay for processing USDA Foods into end products?

Yes, entitlement is drawn down for the raw, bulk USDA Foods sent to processors. The processors utilize the raw USDA Foods and other ingredients to convert into an end product. Recipient agencies (RA) are then required to pay out-of-pocket expenses for the processing of the raw USDA Foods converted into the end product.

What benefits do processing participants receive?

By participating in USDA Foods processing recipient agencies find that they can:

  • Stretch their commodity dollars by ordering lower-cost bulk products;
  • Increase their variety of end products;
  • Reduce labor costs and cash outlays for food preparation; and
  • Reduce storage costs

What regulations govern USDA Foods Processing?

USDA Foods Processing is governed by regulations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations @ 7 CFR Part 250.30. A complete copy of the 7 CFR 250 regulations may be found on the Food Distribution website at: www.fns.usda.gov/fdd/regs/fd_regulations.htm

How do the USDA Food pounds being processed get monitored?

Each recipient agency is primarily responsible as the School Food Authority to oversee and monitor the USDA Food pounds with each manufacturer they process with. This requirement may involve tracking tools (e.g., K12 Foodservice, Processor Line, and Internal Processor Systems), the processor/broker, and ADE for appropriate usage.

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP)

What is the duration of the FFVP program?

The program agreement is in effect for 12 months from July 1 through June 30 of each program year. All program funds must be obligated and all program activities must be completed by June 30th of each program year.

When should the fruits and vegetables be made available?

The fruits and vegetables should be made available during the school day, but not during breakfast or lunch meal service times. Schools may offer the fresh fruits and vegetables in classrooms, hallways, at kiosks, or as part of classroom activities such as nutrition education.

What kinds of fruits and vegetables are permissible to serve in the FFVP?

Fresh fruits and vegetables are allowable. Cooked vegetables that are cooked from fresh are allowed at a maximum of one time per week, if accompanied by a nutrition education lesson. Juice is not allowed as part of the FFVP.

Can schools purchase value added or enhanced products?

Yes, funds may be used to purchase products that include pre-cut or individually bagged fruits and vegetables, etc. The cost of these enhanced items would be included as part of the food cost.

Are there any requirements for serving sizes for the fruits and vegetables?

No. However, the servings offered should be appropriate for the age and consumption pattern of participating children. The portion should serve as a snack.

Can the FFVP funds be used for nutrition education materials?

Schools are required to conduct nutrition education, but FFVP funds may not be used to purchase or develop materials. ADE encourages schools to obtain nutrition education materials from local, state, and national organizations free of charge.

School Gardens

How do I start a School Garden Program?

Starting a School Garden Program may seem overwhelming; however, involving parents, neighbors, and local nurseries or garden supply stores are a great place to start. It is important to use the resources within your community as community involvement is one of the strongest driving forces behind a successful school garden. In addition, getting support from your school administration from the start of the program is very important. Please visit the school gardens webpage for more resources.

How many school gardens are there in Arizona?

For an up-to-date list of school gardens in Arizona, visit www.goodfoodfinderaz.com and search “school gardens.”

Can school garden produce be used in school meals?

Yes! In fact, it is encouraged. When handling fresh produce, practicing food safety both, in and out of the kitchen is important. For more information on practicing food safety in your garden, contact your county health department.

National School Lunch/ Breakfast Program

How does a Local Education Agency (LEA) apply to participate in the School Nutrition Programs?

Local Education Agencies (LEAs) must apply through the Arizona Department of Education (ADE) and complete the requirements prior to the operation of these programs. Once approved, LEAs will receive reimbursement from the ADE for each lunch and breakfast meal served provided they meet established nutrition standards and state and federal regulations. Refer to the information under the How to Apply section of the webpage. To access step by step instructions regarding the application process, required online training and provide a New Sponsor Contact at ADE to help LEAs through the application process.

How many NSLP sponsors are there in Arizona?

Currently, there are over 500 sponsors from the following areas: public district and charter schools, private non-profit schools, residential child care institutions (RCCI’s), and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA).

Summer Food Service Program

How does a school or private non-profit organization apply to participate in the Summer Food Service Program?

When applying for the Summer Food Service Program, please note the following: Sponsors are considered “New” if they have never participated in the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) in the past or if they have had any lapse in participation. To apply as a New Sponsor on the SFSP, please complete the following steps:

  1. Register for and attend SFSP Training and SFSP Computer
  2. Track Training by visiting: www.ade.az.gov/onlineregistration.
  3. Decide which program, Simplified or Seamless, you would like to operate. View the Comparison of Programs.
  4. Gather required paperwork – visit www.azsummerfood.gov
  5. Submit online sponsor and site applications via the CNP Web System

What is a food site sponsor?

Sponsors are organizations (private and public nonprofits, schools, local and county governments, camps, etc.) that are approved by the Arizona Department of Education (ADE) to operate the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and serve FREE meals to children.  Sponsors are responsible for complying with all federal and state regulations relating to the SFSP.

After School Care Snack Program

If an at-risk afterschool center serves supper and chooses to use offer versus serve (OVS), do all of the grains offered have to be whole grain-rich?

Yes.  If an at-risk afterschool center or adult day care center only serves one meal per day and chooses to use OVS, all the grain items offered must be whole grain-rich.  While OVS allows a variety of food items from one component to be served, a center that only serves one meal per day cannot offer one whole grain-rich grain and one enriched grain.  This ensures greater consumption of whole grains if a child or adult chooses to take a grain item.

What if I want to provide after school meals instead of just a snack?

Sites interested in providing evening meals should contact the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) for more information about the At-Risk Afterschool Meals program. Contact (602)-542-8700 and ask for the CACFP Specialist of the Day.

What records need to be kept on file for the After School Care Snack Program?

A detailed description of the record keeping requirements can be found on the After School Care Snack Program Record Keeping tab.

How can I apply to start an After School Care Snack Program at my site?

To participate in the ASCSP, sites must complete Section 10, Afterschool Care Snack Program, on the site application in CNPWeb. The description of the education or enrichment activity must describe the activity and state that the program is open to all. Sites can apply for ASCSP at any time during the school year. Simply submit revised site and sponsor applications in CNPWeb. Talk with your School Food Authority for more information about updating the information in CNPWeb if you are unfamiliar with that process.

If my site is neither site nor area eligible, do I have to collect household applications to determine the eligibility of each student?

No. Since the site is part of the NSLP, the eligibility documentation used to for lunch claims is also used for afterschool care snack claims. Visit the After School Care Snack Program Record Keeping tab for more information about eligibility documentation for the snack program.

How much reimbursement will my site get for serving snacks?

Reimbursement amounts will vary based on the eligibility of the site. Sites that are site or area eligible will serve snacks free of charge, and will count and claim all snacks at the free reimbursement rate. Sites that are neither site nor area eligible will count and claim snacks based on the eligibility status of the students participating in the snack program.

For more information about reimbursement rates, visit the After School Care Snack Program webpage.

What type of snack must be served?

In order to be counted as reimbursable snacks, the snack must contain at least two different components from the following four choices, in the required amounts based on the age of participants:

  • Fluid milk
  • Meat or meat alternate
  • Vegetables or fruits; 100% vegetable or fruit juice
  • Whole or enriched grain product.

Visit the Afterschool Care Snack Program Meal Pattern tab for additional resources.

Is my site eligible to participate in the After School Care Snack Program?

In order to be eligible for participation in the After School Care Snack Program, sites must:

  • Participate in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP);
  • Provide afterschool programming that is open to all students for the primary purpose of providing care;
  • Include education or enrichment in the afterschool care programming.

School Health Programs

Why Is School Health Important?

Research shows that when school districts and schools have effective policies and practices that support the health of their students and staff: student and staff absenteeism decreases, student concentration improves, student behavior problems are reduced and children and adolescents establish life-long health-promoting behaviors.

What is Healthology?

Healthology is a brand that represents Arizona’s Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP) and is housed in ADE’s School Health Program. Healthology, School Health in Action, promotes healthy schools by providing support, resources and information regarding school health related issues. Our website, www.healthologyaz.com, provides information and resources that support a variety of school health issues.

What information is available through the School Health Program team?

The School Health Program team posts many of the services, resources, and information relating to our specific program areas, guidance documents, grant funding opportunities, available trainings and contact information for the School Health Program team on our website at www.healthologyaz.com . Information and resources can also be found on ADE’s website, www.ade.az.gov/health-nutrition on the Health and Nutrition Services page.

What is the purpose of the School Health Program?

Our purpose is to provide schools and communities with support, technical assistance and professional development that model the coordinated school health approach.

What is Coordinated School Health?

The Coordinated School Health (CSH) model consists of eight interactive components: health education, physical education, health services, nutrition services, counseling psychological and social services, healthy and safe school environment, health promotion for staff, and family and community involvement. This approach recognizes the importance of all components working together to create a healthy school environment.

Who is on the School Health Program team?

Our team consists of a School Health Program Director, School Nurse/ Local Wellness Policy Coordinator, Coordinated School Health Program Coordinator, Physical Activity Nutrition Tobacco Prevention (PANT) Coordinator, HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) Specialist and a Health and Nutrition Services Program Evaluator.

What is School Health?

A healthy school environment provides: nursing and other health services that students need to stay in school, nutritious and appealing school meals, opportunities for physical activity that include physical education, health education that covers a range of developmentally appropriate topics taught by knowledgeable teachers, programs that promote the health of school faculty and staff, and counseling, psychological and social services that promote healthy social and emotional development and remove barriers to students’ learning.

I’ve heard of the Coordinated School Health Program. Is that different from the School Health Program?

Historically, Arizona’s Coordinated School Health Program has been a joint venture between the Arizona Department of Education and the Arizona Department of Health Services (funded through a CDC grant). ADE’s Coordinated School Health Program has become a component of the School Health Program team.

What is the School Health Program?

The School Health Program is a unit within the Arizona Department of Education’s Health and Nutrition Services Division.

What services does the School Nurse/Health Services Coordinator provide?

The School Nurse/Health Services Coordinator provides statewide nursing leadership to ensure effective school nursing services, develops and promotes quality standards, provides technical assistance, interpret regulations, and fosters a better understanding regarding the role of the school nurses and the relationship between students’ health and their ability to learn. 

What services does the Coordinated School Health Program Coordinator provide?

The Coordinated School Health Program Coordinator is responsible for CSHP activities including offering technical assistance on health topics in support of the Coordinated School Health Model (e.g. school health councils, school heath teams, staff with designated responsibilities for CSHP activities); coordinating of school health activities; increasing collaboration among agency and school staff in providing health education, services and supporting programs.

What services does the Physical Education/ Physical Activity Coordinator provide?

The Physical Education/ Physical Activity Coordinator provides leadership through professional development on physical education and physical activity for schools and all USDA Child Nutrition programs. The PE/PA Coordinator is also involved in nutrition support services through the CDC’s Coordinated School Health Program. In addition, the PE/PA Coordinator provides technical assistance and guidance on Arizona’s physical education and health education state standards.

What services does the HealthierUS School Challenge Specialist provide?

The HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) Specialist is responsible for encouraging Arizona districts and schools to pursue and achieve the HealthierUS School Challenge awards, recognizing excellence in nutrition and physical activity. The HUSSC Specialist works with other members of the School Health Program team to provide schools with training and technical assistance to enhance physical activity, to create school meals which promote more vegetables and fruits and whole grains, as well as to use local wellness policy to encourage other HUSSC criteria. The HUSSC Specialist is available to assist schools from start to finish throughout the HUSSC award application process.

What services does the Health and Nutrition Program Evaluator provide?

The Health and Nutrition Program Evaluator is responsible for assisting several program areas within Health and Nutrition Services including setting, measuring progress towards, and achieving meaningful goals. The Health and Nutrition Services Program Evaluator is happily available to community partners as a resource for the development and implementation of an evaluation plan, including identifying a reasonable program timeline and goal milestones; creating cooperative strategies that involve all interested parties in evaluation activities; and uncovering good data to measure your program’s success.

What services is the School Health Program team unable to provide?

Due to funding restrictions, the School Health Program team is limited in the number of visits to schools for individualized professional development, in-service trainings or technical assistance. In an effort to provide professional development opportunities, we offer our annual Coordinated School Health Conference and regional trainings throughout the year to support our various program areas. ADE’s School Health Program team is currently funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Child Nutrition Programs and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinated School Health Program.