Frequently Asked Questions

Health & Nutrition Operations

All claims are due by the 10th day of each month. If the 10th falls on a weekend or holiday, then claims are due the following workday.

Reimbursement checks are issued no later than the end of the month for valid claims submitted online by the 10th of the month.

Then submit your claim as soon as possible. If you cannot submit it by the 10th of the month, please contact the Child Nutrition office.

It’s the main security database that is used for all of the Arizona Department of Education’s online applications.

Contact Health & Nutrition Services to complete a CNP Web User Agreement.

Contact the ADE Support Center at (602) 542-7378

Check the CNP Web claims index page for desired claim month. If your status shows “Submitted for Payment” then your check will be mailed within 10 to 15 days after its “Submitted to Accounting” date. To learn more about payment information call (602) 542-5300.

Arizona Nutrition Standards

Use the calculator located at: Here to determine if a food/beverage meets the standard.

In order for a site to participate, your school district must operate the NSLP. Additionally, the after school care program must provide children with regularly scheduled educational or enrichment activities in a supervised environment.

The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) now offers cash reimbursement to help schools serve snacks to children after their regular school day ends. Afterschool snacks give children a nutritional boost and draw them into supervised activities that are safe, fun and filled with learning opportunities.

The guidance manual is located at: Here

The SMP is a program developed to encourage milk consumption by school-age children by providing milk at low or no cost

In order to be reimbursed, the snacks must contain at least two different components of the following four: a serving of fluid milk; a serving of meat or meat alternate; a serving of vegetable(s) or fruit(s) or 100% vegetable or fruit juice; a serving of whole grain or enriched bread and/or cereal.

Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

All of the following:

  1. Child care centers or preschools
  2. Adult daycare centers
  3. Head Starts
  4. Emergency shelters
  5. At-risk afterschool snack programs or outside school hours programs
  6. Daycare homes

You must attend the How to Apply for the CACFP training course. You can register online at: http://www.ade.az.gov/onlineregistration. During training you will receive an electronic application packet that must be submited within 45 days of attending the training.

All recordkeeping forms for child care centers are available at  www.azed.gov/health-nutrition/cacfp//child and all recordkeeping forms for adult care centers are available at www.azed.gov/health-nutrition/cacfp/adult-care-centers/.

If the new site is not part of the same legal entity as the participating center, you must apply as if you are a new sponsor. If the new site is part of the same legal entity as the participating center, you will need to do the following:

  1. Provide program training to all the new staff.
  2. Collect income affidavits for all children or adult enrolled in the new site (not applicable for head starts, emergency, shelters, or at-risk afterschool snack programs).
  3. Update your current application and management plan to include the new site and submit to ADE.
  4. Conduct a pre-approval visit at the new site using the Child or Adult Care Center Monitoring Evaluation Form. This must be submitted to ADE. Please contact your assigned specialist or the Specialist of the Day for technical assistance on monitoring requirements for centers with multiple sites.
  5. Complete a hard copy site application and submit to ADE.
  6. Submit a copy of the new site’s current DHS license
  7. Complete a Sponsor & Site – Add/Change/Delete form and submit to ADE.

ATTENTION HEAD STARTS: You must first go to www.ade.az.gov/schoolfinance/FAQs/CTDS_District and read the instructions and complete a form for each site being added. After the forms are processed, you may follow the instructions above.

Institutions that participate in the CACFP receive reimbursement to enhance their current menus to offer more fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and low fat dairy products. This increases the health and nutritional status of children and adults enrolled while enforcing good eating habits. The additional reimbursement also helps to keep the cost of tuition at more affordable levels.

Daycare home providers may participate under the auspices of a non-profit or public agency called a sponsoring organization. These organizations are responsible for the training, monitoring, and implementation of the Program. For a list of currently participating sponsoring organizations go to Requirements for Participation – FDCH and click on the link for “Family Daycare Home Sponsoring Organizations.”

Institutions are reimbursed for two meals and a snack or two snacks and a meal per day per eligible participant.

Emergency shelters may be reimbursed for up to three meals per day per eligible child.

At-Risk Afterschool Programs may be reimbursed for one snack and one supper per day per eligible child.

Breakfast must include a milk component, a grain component, and a fruit or vegetable component.

Lunch/Supper must include a milk component, a grain component, a meat or meat alternate component, and a fruit and vegetable component from two different sources.

Snacks must include two of the following four components: milk, grain, meat or meal alternate, and fruit or vegetable.

High sugars must be limited to two times per week and may only be served at breakfast and/or snack time. High fat items must be limited to two times per week.

Child Care/Family Centers and Homes


Adult Care Centers


After School Programs


Emergency Shelters


What are the eligibility requirements for participation in the CACFP?

For day care homes:

  • Provide care for no more than 6 children, 4 of which are for compensation, or no more than the license capacity approved by DHS.

For child care centers:

  • For-Profit centers must have at least 25% of enrollment or license capacity, whichever is less, receive Title XX funds under the Social Security Act
  • Non-profit centers must have tax-exempt status and be able to provide documentation of IRS 501(c)(3).

How do I get reimbursed for meals served to children?

In day care homes:

  • Reimbursement rate is based on income eligibility of the geographical area or household income.

In child care centers:

  • A claiming percentage is established for each center based on the income level and household size of each enrolled child/adult.

How are providers paid?

  • On a daily basis, providers keep a record of attendance and a menu of meals provided to children. They submit this regularly to their Sponsoring organization. The Sponsor will calculate and verifies all meals served and submits a claim form to the State Agency for reimbursement. The State Agency then issues a check to the Sponsor for the meals. The Sponsoring Organization will then issue a check to the provider.

Can infant meals be reimbursed on the CACFP?

  • Yes, reimbursable meals for infants may contain either breast milk or iron-fortified infant formula, or both, supplied by the caregiver or by the parent. However, to receive reimbursement, the caregiver must always offer the infant a complete, developmentally appropriate meal. Because we are recognizing the labor involved in serving meals to infants, the meal must be served and fed to the infant by the caregiver.

Can the milk used in the preparation of products such as pudding, cream sauces and ice cream count toward the milk requirement?

  • No. The milk served must be served as a beverage and/or poured over cereal at breakfast or snack.

Can mixed fruits/vegetables in dishes such as stew or gelatin salad be counted as meeting the two or more requirement for fruits and vegetables?

  • No. When used in a dish or casserole, the mixed fruits/vegetables are counted as one component.

Can providers claim own children?

    • Provider’s own children and under what circumstances children qualify to be claimed:
      • Is the provider’s household/economic unit income eligible for Tier I?
      • Is the child part of the provider’s household or economic unit?
      • Does the child reside in the home for extended periods of time?
      • Does the provider have actual custodial care for the child (regardless of the child relationship or legal status relative to the provider)
      • In the case of custodial care, is the period of time indefinite?
      • Is the child enrolled and participating in the CACFP during the time of meal service?
      • Are there nonresidential enrolled children present and participating in the meal service?

If the answer to each of these questions is YES, the child(ren) is (are) eligible as provider’s own. On the other hand, if any of the answers are NO, the provider cannot claim meals served to this (these) child(ren).


What are the eligibility requirements for adult day care centers participating in the CACFP?

  • For-Profit centers must have at least 25% of enrollment or license capacity, whichever is less, receive Title XIX funds under the Social Security Act
  • Non-profit centers must have tax-exempt status and be able to provide documentation of IRS 501(c)(3).

How do I get on the Program?

  • Applications are distributed in the workshop and instruction is provided on how to complete and submit the application.

What are the age requirements for participants?

  • Reimbursement may be claimed for meals served to functionally impaired adults or adults age 60 and older

What are the meal requirements for reimbursement?

  • In order for a meal to be eligible for reimbursement, centers must meet the CACFP meal pattern requirements and keep all required documentation.

How is the blended rate for meal reimbursement determined?

  • The blended is based on a 30-day collection period during which income applications are taken for all adults in care.

What are the eligibility requirements for after school sites participating in the CACFP?

  • After school sites must be located with in the attendance area of a school in which 50 percent or more of the children enrolled are eligible for free or reduced price meals.
  • Programs must provide children with regularly scheduled activities in a structured and supervised environment. The program must also include educational or enrichment activities.
  • In addition, For-Profit centers must have at least 25% of enrollment or license capacity, whichever is less, receive Title XIX funds under the Social Security Act
  • Non-profit centers must have tax-exempt status and be able to provide documentation of IRS 501(c)(3).

Is licensing required for after school sites participating in the CACFP?

  • No. Eligible after school care programs do not need to be licensed in order to participate in CACFP unless there is a State or local requirement for licensing. If there is no State or local requirement, then programs must meet State and local health and safety standards.

Are meals served on weekends eligible for reimbursement?

  • Yes. Snacks may be reimbursed if they are served on weekends, holiday, or vacation periods that occur during the regular school year. Snacks served during summer vacation are not eligible for reimbursement.

What are the record keeping requirements for after school sites participating in the CACFP?

  • Programs must keep the following records:
    1. Meal Counts
    2. Attendance Records
    3. Menus and Menu Production Records

What are the age requirements for participants in after school programs?

  • Reimbursement may be claimed for snacks served to all children through the age of 18 in eligible after school programs. Reimbursement may also be claimed for those children who turn 19 during the school year.

What are the eligibility requirements for emergency shelters participating in the CACFP?

  • In order to be eligible for participation in CACFP, emergency shelters must:
    1. Provide temporary residence to children and their parents or guardians, and;
    2. Serve meals in a congregate setting.

Is licensing required for emergency shelters participating in the CACFP?

  • No. Emergency shelters do not need to be licensed in order to participate in CACFP, nor do they have to offer formal child care in order to be eligible for CACFP reimbursement. However,programs must meet State and local health and safety standards.

Are meals served on weekends eligible for reimbursement?

  • Yes. Meals and snacks served year round are eligible for reimbursement in emergency shelters.

What are the record keeping requirements for emergency shelters participating in the CACFP?

  • Programs must keep the following records:
    1. Meal Counts
    2. Attendance Records
    3. Menus and Menu Production Records

What are the age requirements for participants in emergency shelters?

  • Reimbursement may be claimed for meals and snacks served to all children through the age of 12 who are residing in the shelter. Migrant children age 15 and younger and children with disabilities regardless of age may also receive CACFP meals and snacks at the emergency shelters where they reside.

How do I add a new site?

The sponsor must conduct the following:

    1. Train all staff on CACFP job duties prior to participation.
    2. Conduct a CACFP enrollment (income affidavits, claiming rosters, etc.).
    3. Conduct a pre-approval (monitoring) visit prior to adding the site.
    4. Complete and submit hard-copy site application(s).
    5. Complete an Add-Change-Delete form.
    6. Update and submit your revised Application and Management plan.
    7. Submit a copy of the new site license.
    8. Update training and monitoring plans.
    9. Complete and submit the online CNPWEB site application.

These may be faxed to: (602) 542-3818, or mailed to:

The Arizona Department of Education
Child & Adult Care Food Program, Bin # 7
1535 W. Jefferson Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007

Once the forms have been received in our office, an online CNP Web Site Application will be created, submitted and approved. Upon completion of the newly approved Site Application, the Sponsoring Organization is responsible for maintaining the online Site Application and submitting any changes or updates for future approval.

Food Distribution Program

Surplus list is available on Mondays and Thursdays from 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m (Phoenix time). One request per week. On the CNP2000 website, under Inventory, click on Surplus List and select the items you want, then copy and paste the request onto a Word document and send request to FDP@AZED.GOV

When an allocation is created, the entitlement funds have already been taken out of your entitlement. If it is on your order form, then it has already been paid for. When you refuse an item on your allocation then the cost of that product is credited back to your entitlement.

In CNP2000, click “Documents” then click on one of the Calendars, depending on which USDA Foods you are looking for.  This information is updated on Fridays.  Also you can find the calendars on the ADE’s website, www.azed.gov/health-nutrition/food-distribution 

Planned Usage allocations are created from the surveys that are filled out by the schools indicating what USDA Foods they want and are reserved for them.  A & B allocations are USDA Foods that are allocated out to all schools and are not reserved.

All product will be put in surplus so other schools may be able to use it, your entitlement will not be credited back and you will receive an excess storage fee of $1.10 for each case.

Yes, you will always stay on the same day, (Monday, Tuesday, etc.) but you have 3 delivery date choices by clicking on the drop down box in the date box.

Brown box – 14 days, Fresh – 14 days, Planned Usage – none, Surplus – none.

Brown box – 45 days, Fresh – 14 days, Planned Usage – end of the allocated month or 45 days, Surplus – 7 days.

USDA Foods Processing

Any State Distributing Agency and Recipient Agencies, such as school districts, are eligible.

The time frame for processing USDA Foods into end products is 17 months. This begins on July 1st of the new school year up to November 30th of the following school year.

Example: A recipient agency diverts 1,000 pounds of USDA Foods to a processor for SY11-12. During SY11-12 recipient agency processes 750 pounds. The recipient agency has till November 30th of the following SY12-13 to use the remaining 250 pounds diverted in SY11-12.

 

Food Distribution under School Food Programs establishes the surveys in January of each year. All processing surveys are due in February by recipient agencies where ADE compiles survey results into truckloads to place orders with USDA in March.

This information can be found in the USDA Foods Web-Based Ordering System – CNP2000, under Processing Catalogs with each processor listing approved products in column F of the Summary End Product Data Schedule.

Yes, entitlement is drawn down for the raw bulk USDA Foods sent to processors. The processors utilize the raw USDA Foods and other ingredients to convert into an end product. Recipient agencies are then required to pay out-of-pocket expenses for the processing of the raw USDA Foods diverted.

By participating in USDA Foods processing State distributing agencies and recipient agencies find that they can:

  • Stretch their commodity dollars by ordering lower-cost bulk products;
  • Eliminate back-hauling charges because USDA vendors deliver USDA Foods directly to processors;
  • Increase their variety of end products;
  • Reduce labor costs and cash outlays for food preparation; and
  • Reduce storage costs

USDA Foods Processing is governed by regulations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations @ 7 CFR Part 250.30. A complete copy of the 7 CFR 250 regulations may be found on the Food Distribution website at: www.fns.usda.gov/fdd/regs/fd_regulations.htm

Each recipient agency is primarily responsible as the School Food Authority to oversee and monitor the USDA Food pounds with each manufacturer they process with. This requirement may involve tracking tools (e.g., K12 Foodservice, Processor Line, and Internal Processor Systems), the processor/broker, and ADE for appropriate usage.

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP)

No.

The program agreement is in effect for 12 months from July 1 through June 30 of each program year. All program funds must be obligated and all program activities must be completed by June 30th of each program year.

The fruits and vegetables should be made available during the school day, but not during breakfast or lunch meal service times. Schools may offer the fresh fruits and vegetables in classrooms, hallways, at kiosks, or as part of classroom activities such as nutrition education.

Fresh fruits and vegetables are allowable. Cooked vegetables that are cooked from fresh are allowed at a maximum of one time per week, if accompanied by a nutrition education lesson. Juice is not allowed as part of the FFVP.

Yes, funds may be used to purchase products that include pre-cut or individually bagged fruits and vegetables, etc. The cost of these enhanced items would be included as part of the food cost.

No. However, the servings offered should be appropriate for the age and consumption pattern of participating children. The portion should serve as a snack.

Schools are required to conduct nutrition education, but FFVP funds may not be used to purchase or develop materials. ADE encourages schools to obtain nutrition education materials from local, state, and national organizations free of charge.

School Gardens

Starting a School Garden Program may seem overwhelming; however, involving parents, neighbors, and local nurseries or garden supply stores are a great place to start. It is important to use the resources within your community as community involvement is one of the strongest driving forces behind a successful school garden. In addition, getting support from your school administration from the start of the program is very important. Please visit the school gardens webpage for more resources.

According to a survey sent to Arizona school districts on the National School Lunch Program in 2012 it is estimated that 100 Arizona school districts operate at least one school garden.

Yes, there are several grant and fundraising opportunities available, nationally, for school and community gardens. If you would like help locating funds to start or expand your garden program please email ArizonaFarmtoSchool@azed.gov.

Yes! In fact, it is encouraged. When handling fresh produce, practicing food safety both, in and out of the kitchen is important. For more information on practicing food safety in your garden, contact your county health department.

National School Lunch/ Breakfast Program

Start by registering and attending an A+ School Lunch Training. To register, visit  www.ade.az.gov/onlineregistration/ and click on Health & Nutrition Services: NSLP. In addition, a list of required documents found at www.azed.gov/health-nutrition/nslp/operate-nlsp/how-to-apply/ will need to be completed and submitted. 

Refer to the Child Nutrition Programs Guidance Manual located at:  www.azed.gov/health-nutrition/nslp/manuals/

Currently, there are over 500 sponsors from the following areas: public district and charter schools, private non-profit schools, residential child care institutions (RCCI’s), and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA).

Summer Food Service Program

When applying for the Summer Food Service Program, please note the following: Sponsors are considered “New” if they have never participated in the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) in the past or if they have had any lapse in participation. To apply as a New Sponsor on the SFSP, please complete the following steps:

  1. Register for and attend SFSP Training and SFSP Computer
  2. Track Training by visiting: www.ade.az.gov/onlineregistration.
  3. Decide which program, Simplified or Seamless, you would like to operate. View the Comparison of Programs.
  4. Gather required paperwork – visit www.azsummerfood.gov
  5. Submit online sponsor and site applications via the CNP Web System

Sponsors are organizations (private and public nonprofits, schools, local and county governments, camps, etc.) that are approved by the Arizona Department of Education (ADE) to operate the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and serve FREE meals to children.  Sponsors are responsible for complying with all federal and state regulations relating to the SFSP.

After School Care Snack Program - FAQ’s for Regular Public and Private Sponsors

The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) now offers cash reimbursement to help schools serve snacks to children after their regular school day ends. Afterschool snacks give children a nutritional boost and draw them into supervised activities that are safe, fun and filled with learning opportunities.

Afterschool snacks help ensure that children receive the nutrition they need to learn, play and grow. Organized, structured, and supervised programs that provide snacks allow children to think and behave better, and help them make the grade!

In order for a site to participate, your school district must run the NSLP. Additionally the afterschool care program must provide children with regularly scheduled educational or enrichment activities in a supervised environment. Contact your State education agency for further information regarding program eligibility.

In order to be reimbursed, the snacks must contain at least two different components of the following four: a serving of fluid milk; a serving of meat or meat alternate; a serving of vegetable(s) or fruit(s) or full strength vegetable or fruit juice; a serving of whole grain or enriched bread and/or cereal.

Snacks served in afterschool care programs that are “area eligible” (see Question 6) will be reimbursed at the free rate, regardless of an individual student’s eligibility for free or reduced price lunches. Snacks served in afterschool care programs that are not area eligible will be reimbursed at the free, reduced price and paid rate depending on each individual’s eligibility for free or reduced price meals. The reimbursement rates are adjusted annually. For the most recent list of reimbursement rates visit USDA’s Afterschool Snack website at http://www.fns.usda.gov/school-meals/rates-reimbursement. The rates of reimbursement for Alaska and Hawaii are higher.

An afterschool care program site is “area eligible” if it is located at a school or in the attendance area of a school where at least 50 percent of the enrolled children are eligible for free or reduced price meals. For example, if a high school with less than 50 percent free or reduced price school enrollment is located in the attendance area of a middle school that has at least 50 percent or more of the enrolled children eligible for free or reduced price meals, then the afterschool care program located in the school area would be area eligible.

Since your school district is already participating in the NSLP, it will have free and reduced price applications on file. The eligibility determinations for those applications would apply for both the lunch and snack service under the NSLP. If an approved free or reduced price application is not on file, the school district will earn the paid rate of reimbursement for snacks served to that student unless the student makes and application and is approved for free or reduced price benefits.

Contact the school food service director in your school district. You may also want to contact your State education agency for more information. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service home page at http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Contacts/StateDirectory.htm has a list of State Agencies.

As soon as the State agency approves our application, reimbursement will be earned for snacks served. Your program may also be eligible for retroactive reimbursements if you met snack program requirements and maintained accurate records of the snacks served back to October 1, 2001. Contact your school food service director (and State agency) to determine if you are eligible to receive retroactive reimbursements.

Your school food service staff will provide you with specific information on the reporting and recordkeeping requirements. You will need to maintain a roster or sign-in sheet for participating children. Additionally, if you are area eligible, you must record and report the number of snacks served each day by category of reimbursement (i.e., whether they are served free, at a reduced price or paid). You will also be required to maintain documentation of compliance with the meal pattern.

If you are not eligible under the requirements for the NSLP, you may still qualify for snack reimbursement under the Child and Adult Care Food Program. To find out, contact your CNP specialist.

The NSLP is administered on the Federal level by the Food and Nutrition Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Within individual States, the program is administered by a State Agency, in most cases through offices in the State Department of Education. At the local level, the program is administered by the school/school district.

After School Care Snack Program – FAQ’s for Residential Child Care Institutions and Boarding Schools

The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) now offers cash reimbursement to help RCCIs and boarding schools serve snacks to children after the regular school day ends. After school snacks give children a nutritional boost and draw them into supervised activities that are safe, fun and filled with learning opportunities.

After school snacks help ensure that children receive the nutrition they need to learn, play and grow. Organized, structured, and supervised programs that provide snacks allow children to think and behave better, and help them make the grade!

In order for a site to participate, your facility must run the NSLP. Additionally the after school care program must provide children with regularly scheduled educational or enrichment activities in a supervised environment. Contact your NSLP Program Specialist or the Arizona Department of Education (ADE), Child Nutrition Programs (602-542-8700) for further information regarding program eligibility.

In order to be reimbursed, the snacks must contain at least two different components of the following four: a serving of fluid milk; a serving of meat or meat alternate; a serving of vegetable(s) or fruit(s) or full strength vegetable or fruit juice; a serving of whole grain or enriched bread and/or cereal. See attached Snack Meal Pattern.

Snacks served in after school care programs that are “area eligible” (see Question 6) will be reimbursed at the free rate, regardless of an individual student’s eligibility for free or reduced price lunches. Snacks served in after school care programs that are not area eligible will be reimbursed at the free, reduced price and paid rate depending on each individual’s eligibility for free or reduced price meals. The reimbursement rates are adjusted annually. For the most recent list of reimbursement rates visit USDA’s Afterschool Snack website at http://www.fns.usda.gov/school-meals/rates-reimbursement. The rates of reimbursement for Alaska and Hawaii are higher.

An after school care program site is “area eligible” if it is located at an RCCI or boarding school or located in the attendance area of a public school where at least 50 percent of the enrolled children are eligible for free or reduced price meals. For example, if a boarding school or RCCI with less than 50 percent free or reduced price enrollment is located in the attendance area of a public school that has at least 50 percent or more of the enrolled children eligible for free or reduced price meals, then the after school care program located in the school area would be area eligible.

Since your facility is already participating in the NSLP, it will have free and reduced price applications on file for day students. The eligibility determinations for those applications would apply for both the lunch and snack service under the NSLP. If an approved free or reduced price application is not on file, the facility will earn the paid rate of reimbursement for snacks served to that child unless the child’s family completes an application and is approved for free or reduced price benefits. If all residential students are free in your facility, the Statement of Facts or Master List document will verify that all snacks will be reimbursed at the free rate for those children.

Contact your NSLP Program Specialist or ADE (602-542-8700) for application information. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service home page at http://www.fns.usda.gov/school-meals/afterschool-snacks may also be of help in providing additional information regarding the snack program.

As soon as ADE approves your application, reimbursement will be earned for snacks served. Your program may also be eligible for retroactive reimbursements if you met snack program requirements and maintained accurate records of the snacks served back to October 1, 2001. Contact ADE to determine if you are eligible to receive retroactive reimbursements.

You will need to maintain a roster or sign-in sheet for participating children. Additionally, if you are not area eligible, you must record and report the number of snacks served each day by category of reimbursement (i.e., whether they are served free, at a reduced price or paid). You will also be required to maintain documentation of compliance with the meal pattern.

The NSLP is administered on the Federal level by the Food and Nutrition Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Within Arizona, the program is administered by the Arizona Department of Education. At the local level, the program is administered by the RCCI or boarding school facility.

School Health Programs

Research shows that when school districts and schools have effective policies and practices that support the health of their students and staff: student and staff absenteeism decreases, student concentration improves, student behavior problems are reduced and children and adolescents establish life-long health-promoting behaviors.

Healthology is a brand that represents Arizona’s Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP) and is housed in ADE’s School Health Program. Healthology, School Health in Action, promotes healthy schools by providing support, resources and information regarding school health related issues. Our website, www.healthologyaz.com, provides information and resources that support a variety of school health issues.

The School Health Program team posts many of the services, resources, and information relating to our specific program areas, guidance documents, grant funding opportunities, available trainings and contact information for the School Health Program team on our website at www.healthologyaz.com . Information and resources can also be found on ADE’s website, www.ade.az.gov/health-nutrition on the Health and Nutrition Services page.

Our purpose is to provide schools and communities with support, technical assistance and professional development that model the coordinated school health approach.

The Coordinated School Health (CSH) model consists of eight interactive components: health education, physical education, health services, nutrition services, counseling psychological and social services, healthy and safe school environment, health promotion for staff, and family and community involvement. This approach recognizes the importance of all components working together to create a healthy school environment.

Our team consists of a School Health Program Director, School Nurse/ Local Wellness Policy Coordinator, Coordinated School Health Program Coordinator, Physical Activity Nutrition Tobacco Prevention (PANT) Coordinator, HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) Specialist and a Health and Nutrition Services Program Evaluator.

A healthy school environment provides: nursing and other health services that students need to stay in school, nutritious and appealing school meals, opportunities for physical activity that include physical education, health education that covers a range of developmentally appropriate topics taught by knowledgeable teachers, programs that promote the health of school faculty and staff, and counseling, psychological and social services that promote healthy social and emotional development and remove barriers to students’ learning.

Historically, Arizona’s Coordinated School Health Program has been a joint venture between the Arizona Department of Education and the Arizona Department of Health Services (funded through a CDC grant). ADE’s Coordinated School Health Program has become a component of the School Health Program team.

The School Health Program is a unit within the Arizona Department of Education’s Health and Nutrition Services Division.

The School Nurse/Health Services Coordinator provides statewide nursing leadership to ensure effective school nursing services, develops and promotes quality standards, provides technical assistance, interpret regulations, and fosters a better understanding regarding the role of the school nurses and the relationship between students’ health and their ability to learn. 

The Coordinated School Health Program Coordinator is responsible for CSHP activities including offering technical assistance on health topics in support of the Coordinated School Health Model (e.g. school health councils, school heath teams, staff with designated responsibilities for CSHP activities); coordinating of school health activities; increasing collaboration among agency and school staff in providing health education, services and supporting programs.

The Physical Education/ Physical Activity Coordinator provides leadership through professional development on physical education and physical activity for schools and all USDA Child Nutrition programs. The PE/PA Coordinator is also involved in nutrition support services through the CDC’s Coordinated School Health Program. In addition, the PE/PA Coordinator provides technical assistance and guidance on Arizona’s physical education and health education state standards.

The HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) Specialist is responsible for encouraging Arizona districts and schools to pursue and achieve the HealthierUS School Challenge awards, recognizing excellence in nutrition and physical activity. The HUSSC Specialist works with other members of the School Health Program team to provide schools with training and technical assistance to enhance physical activity, to create school meals which promote more vegetables and fruits and whole grains, as well as to use local wellness policy to encourage other HUSSC criteria. The HUSSC Specialist is available to assist schools from start to finish throughout the HUSSC award application process.

The Health and Nutrition Program Evaluator is responsible for assisting several program areas within Health and Nutrition Services including setting, measuring progress towards, and achieving meaningful goals. The Health and Nutrition Services Program Evaluator is happily available to community partners as a resource for the development and implementation of an evaluation plan, including identifying a reasonable program timeline and goal milestones; creating cooperative strategies that involve all interested parties in evaluation activities; and uncovering good data to measure your program’s success.

Due to funding restrictions, the School Health Program team is limited in the number of visits to schools for individualized professional development, in-service trainings or technical assistance. In an effort to provide professional development opportunities, we offer our annual Coordinated School Health Conference and regional trainings throughout the year to support our various program areas. ADE’s School Health Program team is currently funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Child Nutrition Programs and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinated School Health Program.