Frequently Asked Questions

A-F Letter Grade Hiatus/Transition (7)

Where can I find information about the Every Student Succeeds Act?

The U.S. Department of Education has posted a set of Frequently Asked Questions concerning the transition and full implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) here. More resources can be found here.

Since graduation requirements related to AIMS changed in 2014, is there an updated graduation rate technical manual available yet?

Achieve has updated the “Grad, Dropout, and Persistence Rate Technical Manual” (July 2015) with the most current business rules and posted it on the technical assistance/resources page of the Accountability website.

Are AIMS Science results embargoed?

The embargo in the past has applied to AIMS Mathematics and Reading results used in A-F Accountability determinations, but schools have always been able to use their assessment data in order to make educational decisions on behalf of students and/or programs. Assuming there is no student data privacy concern, there is no embargo on 2016 AIMS Science data.

How does Arizona’s Growth Model account for demographic or regional differences among students in its calculations?

Arizona’s Growth Model does not account for any demographic or context variables in the calculation phase itself. The calculations do not take into account what school or LEA each student is in. The algorithms used only know students’ grades in a set of calendar years and what scores they earned on the state assessments in those years. When growth data are reported for groups of students, the individual growth scores are grouped after the growth calculations have been performed. No adjustments are made to the calculations on the basis of any demographic or other group, so that all students are treated equally by the model.

Does the transition from AIMS/AIMSA to AZMERIT break the growth model?

No, growth can be calculated on two different tests across different years. The first year of producing SGP scores with AzMERIT will be during the FY2016-2017, but technically, Student Growth Percentiles can be calculated even if test history is based on different types of test, e.g., current year test is AzMERIT and prior year tests are AIMS/AIMSA. This is because the measure compares how students do on the test this year compared to their peers who scored similarly on state assessments in prior years. After the growth model is validated, ADE will calculate and report SGP. A new growth model may be considered for the revised accountability system to be developed. ADE will study & discuss viability of SGP for use beyond Grade 8 and across administration modalities.growth model graph

How will AIMS & AIMS A Science be used in accountability determinations?

The Department has no recommendation for how to include Science results in school and district accountability at this time. In the absence of an A-F letter grade, the Department will report Science performance alongside other academic indicators required for Accountability purposes. The State Board of Education’s A-F Ad Hoc Committee will determine if and how AIMS and AIMS A Science results will be included in the new Accountability System.

A-F Letter Grading Policies (5)

Do charter schools get letter grades?

For school years prior and up to 2013-2014, yes. All Arizona public schools, both charter and district, received letter grades.

Is my FY2014 grade my FY2015 grade?

No. As of this date, the 2014 A-F Letter Grade was the last letter grade issued by the Department. Many states have used the last letter grade issued under their former test to transition to the academic performance on a new statewide assessment; however, the Department has not made any recommendation for the State Board to adopt this approach.

Does my child’s school have a letter grade?

For school years prior and up to 2013-2014, yes. More information on specific schools can be found here.

Arizona Report Cards

How can a district or LEA get an “A” letter grade if it has an “F” school in it?

The letter grading process for multi-site LEAs is described here.

AzMERIT and New Accountability (18)

Grades 3-8 and Grade 11 are used in the Percent Tested determination. Does this mean Grades 9 and 10 are not used in Percent Tested?

In Grades 3-8, the percentage of students tested will be based on the AzMERIT grade level ELA and Mathematics tests only. For high school, the percentage of students tested will be based on whether or not all students enrolled in Grade 11 currently have a CY or PY ELA or Mathematics assessment (this would include AIMS from when these students were in Grade 10 as an eligible assessment).

What are our AMOs now?

New AMOs based on 2015 AzMERIT results will be reported for the 2015 as well as the 2016 school year by January 2016. Please see page 138 of our ESEA waiver request for more information.

Why is ADE going back to the State Board if they already adopted the Priority criteria to identify schools with “below average” levels of performance?

SBE members requested an amendment requiring ADE to further analyze how the proposed criteria would impact alternative schools and how Reward, Focus, and Priority labels might be applied to non-Title I schools during the transition of the state accountability system.

When will we learn more information about the new accountability system discussed in SB1289?

Any materials (white paper, presentations, etc.) ADE provides to the A-F Subcommittee will also be made available on the ADE Accountability website. Please refer to the State Board of Education website for a schedule of committee meetings, agenda items, etc.

When will ADE tell me my school can exit Focus or Priority status?

Schools may exit Focus or Priority status based on eligibility and their performance on the 2015 AzMERIT; however, schools may also be re-identified for Focus or Priority status based on their performance on the 2016 AzMERIT. Therefore, ADE will notify schools of their official status when 2016 AzMERIT data are available. Criteria for identifying new Focus and Priority schools are available here.

When will I know who is in my Bottom 25%?

ADE will not identify a Bottom 25% subgroup for high stakes accountability purposes until AMO targets are identified and new Reward, Focus, Priority schools are designated based on 2016 AzMERIT data. Schools may use prior year assessment data to estimate their own Bottom Quartile using guidance available here.

For the proposed RFP criteria, will Title I schools only be compared to other Title I schools?

Each school in the state will be compared to all other schools regardless of their Title I   status. This is in order to identify the schools with below average levels of performance as required by SB1289. For Reward identification, the criteria will be applied to Title I schools only.

What roster will be used to calculate 95% tested?

The State Board of Education’s A-F Ad Hoc Advisory Committee will be discussing and deciding what business rules to use for the new Accountability system.

Will there still be an appeals process?

If a school receives a label (or does not receive a label for recognition) under the transitional accountability system, the appeals process mandated by ARS 15-241 will still be in place.

Why bother reporting accountability data if there’s no A-F Letter Grade?

The need to ensure all students are receiving an adequate education is not dissolved by any new statute, new standards, or new tests. In a state with such a robust school choice system, a number of organizations, other statutes, as well as parents rely on this data to inform  various decisions — some of which are high stakes. Also, the suspension of the state system for labeling schools does not change the federal requirement for accountability for LEAs which use Title I funds in their schools and programs.

How will AIMS & AIMS A Science be used in accountability determinations?

The Department has no recommendation for how to include Science results in school and district accountability at this time. In the absence of an A-F letter grade, the Department will report Science performance alongside other academic indicators required for Accountability purposes. The State Board of Education’s A-F Ad Hoc Committee will determine if and how AIMS and AIMS A Science results will be included in the new Accountability System.

How will choosing to give the CBT over PBT impact my accountability rating?

Like any valid measurement system, we will ensure comparability among schools which choose either modality.

 

Are aggregated test results reported by grade level or by assessment type for non-high school End of Course (EOC) testing?

Results are reported by test content, regardless of student grade. For example: If a student in 8th Grade takes the EOC test on Algebra II, that student’s results will be included in Algebra II reporting.

 

Is my FY2014 grade my FY2015 grade?

No. As of this date, the 2014 A-F Letter Grade was the last letter grade issued by the Department. Many states have used the last letter grade issued under their former test to transition to the academic performance on a new statewide assessment; however, the Department has not made any recommendation for the State Board to adopt this approach.

Where can I find information about the Every Student Succeeds Act?

The U.S. Department of Education has posted a set of Frequently Asked Questions concerning the transition and full implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) here. More resources can be found here.

Should we test Grade 9 and/or 10 students since only Grade 11 students count on AzMERIT test participation calculation for high schools?

YES. Schools should administer the appropriate EOC test when students are exposed to corresponding content regardless of their grade level. Most Grade 9 and 10 students take high school level English/Language Arts and Mathematics content. The school’s percent proficient rate will be based on all students (in all grades) who complete AzMERIT. Some Grade 11 students will not take an EOC test, but their participation from Grade 9 or 10 would be captured for school accountability.

How will the new test impact accountability?

The impact of the new statewide test, on accountability is described here.

Data Collection and Uses (8)

Are aggregated test results reported by grade level or by assessment type for non-high school End of Course (EOC) testing?

Results are reported by test content, regardless of student grade. For example: If a student in 8th Grade takes the EOC test on Algebra II, that student’s results will be included in Algebra II reporting.

 

Why is the graduation rate reported here for Arizona’s Bottom 25% subgroup higher than the graduation rate for all of Cohort 2014 (4-year cohort for FY2015)?

here

The reported Bottom 25% subgroup is not actually the lowest 25% of academic achievers in the graduating cohort. Students in this subgroup previously scored in the Bottom 25% at their school when they took the high school AIMS in FY2012. This subgroup consists of students from higher achieving schools and excludes all students who did not test on AIMS at the end of their sophomore year (all students who dropped out in grade 9 or before they were scheduled to test on AIMS in grade 10).

How will students who retest on EOC tests this Fall or Spring be used in Accountability?

How EOC retests are used in school accountability has not yet been finalized/decided. We will keep you informed as we develop the new accountability system.

 

Grades 3-8 and Grade 11 are used in the Percent Tested determination. Does this mean Grades 9 and 10 are not used in Percent Tested?

In Grades 3-8, the percentage of students tested will be based on the AzMERIT grade level ELA and Mathematics tests only. For high school, the percentage of students tested will be based on whether or not all students enrolled in Grade 11 currently have a CY or PY ELA or Mathematics assessment (this would include AIMS from when these students were in Grade 10 as an eligible assessment).

How does counting only Grade 11 students in percent tested affect my percent passing?

Percent tested and percent passing are two different calculations. Percent tested answers the question “What percentage of the Grade 11 students have completed an ELA and/or Math test while in high school?” whereas percent passing answers the question “What percentage of the students who completed AzMERIT this year passed the test they took?”. See the May 2015 Grader for how testing less than 95% of students may impact the school’s final proficiency rate used for accountability purposes.

For the “Low Achieving Subgroup” determination in the proposed RFP criteria, what does it mean in terms of “Highest quartile of overlap between the school’s B25 subgroup and the state Bottom 25%” and how it is calculated?

The State Bottom 25% refers to all students whose scale score is at the lowest quartile in the state for each subject and grade level in that single year. For example, the scale score at the 25th percentile for the 2014 AIMS administration are posted on page 93 of our ESEA waiver request. School B25% refers to the lowest achieving students within a school across all subjects and grade levels. Schools, where a large percentage of their Bottom Quartile Student Subgroup is in the state bottom 25%, are what we are identifying in this criterion. We rank order this percentage for all the schools in the state and identify the schools that have the highest percentage of students who score in the Bottom 25% of the state. You can also find the information at the most recent ESEA resubmission: http://www.azed.gov/eseawaiver/

When we report high school students, are we now assuming for SY 2014-15 in math and ELA that all high school students are potentially participating in assessments? So we would count them as not participating if they do not have an assessment?

In the past, we only reported students in their second year of high school (based on cohort). Given that NCSC only occurs in Grade 11 and EOC participation becomes a local decision, schools are now accountable for the students’ assessment in Math and ELA by the time they complete Grade 11. To calculate test participation in 2015 high school ELA (or Math); divide (numerator) the total number of students who have taken Grade 10 AIMS in 2014, or have finished any ELA EOC in FY2015, or have taken NCSC in FY2015, by (denominator) the total number of Grade 11 students enrolled.

 

          High School Test Participation = (Students who took Grade 10 AIMS in FY2014, or finished any ELA EOC in FY2015, or took NCSC in FY2015) ÷ (Total number of Grade 11 students enrolled).

Does successfully moving from one achievement level to a higher one necessarily produce a higher growth percentile than moving up within an achievement level?

No. Student growth percentiles are calculated on the basis of overall growth using exact test scores, not with reference to movement between achievement levels. For example, a student can have a higher growth percentile and stay within the Approaches level of achievement than a student moving from Approaches to Meets. Growth percentiles describe growth anywhere along the score scale, not just as achievement levels are crossed.

Data Embargoes (2)

Are AIMS Science results embargoed?

The embargo in the past has applied to AIMS Mathematics and Reading results used in A-F Accountability determinations, but schools have always been able to use their assessment data in order to make educational decisions on behalf of students and/or programs. Assuming there is no student data privacy concern, there is no embargo on 2016 AIMS Science data.

How will the data released after the embargo differ from what is used for Accountability purposes?

Data used for any state or federal accountability measures will apply business rules such as FAY, concurrent enrolment, etc.

Definitions (7)

What does “the waiver” do?

The ESEA Waiver (aka Flexibility Request, flexibility/waiver from NCLB, etc.) mainly allows schools and the state to decide where and how to use Title I resources to increase student achievement. The waiver also releases schools from a punitive label of “persistently low achieving” if 100% of their students do not pass the statewide assessment or the school does not meet the annual measurable objectives (AMO) target for multiple years.

What is an academic peer?

Academic peers are defined as students in a particular grade with a similar state assessment score history. The type of test records to be included is discussed in the Arizona Department of Education A-F Technical Manual available on ADE’s website. The state assessment score history examined includes all past scores available for a given student. So, for a student who has had low state assessment scores for the last few years, his or her growth is compared to students who have scored similarly.

 

What is growth?

For an individual student, growth is a measure of progress in academic achievement. For some states, this measure might simply be a change (a gain or a loss) in test scores from one year to the next. For Arizona, growth is not expressed in test score point gains or losses, but in student growth percentiles. An individual’s test scores are used as the basis for a growth calculation, using a statistical model called quantile regression. The calculations use all available test scores to estimate an individual growth score, or student growth percentile. The student growth percentile tells us how a student’s current test score compares with that of other students across the state whose previous test scores are similar. This process can be understood as a comparison to members of a student’s academic peer group. So, Arizona’s measure of growth is a normative rather than an absolute one.

For example: what does it really mean when Susie’s Reading score was 379 last year and is now 402? Is 23 points a big or a small increase? How much did she really learn? Obviously, just seeing how much a student’s test score went up or down in two consecutive years is not really a meaningful exercise. Test score points are not in units that have a real world meaning, so we are not sure whether students gaining a certain number of points are showing typical or extraordinary academic growth.

Now, using the Growth Model, students with the same achievement history are compared to each other, helping us understand whether their growth is high, typical, or low. We are not stuck trying to understand what a 23-point increase really means, because we can understand how surprising or unsurprising the new score is on the basis of other students’ scores, students that were similar in the first place. We use other students’ scores to put the norm in normative, and to understand every student’s academic progress.

What is a median growth percentile?

The median growth percentile summarizes student growth rates by LEA, school, and grade level, or other group of interest. The median is calculated by taking the individual student growth percentiles of all the students in the group being analyzed, ordering them from lowest to highest, and identifying the middle score – the median. The median may not be as familiar to people as the average, but it is similar in interpretation – it summarizes the group in a single number that is fairly calculated to reflect the group as a whole. Medians are more appropriate to use than averages when summarizing a collection of percentile scores.

What is a student growth percentile?

A student growth percentile defines how much relative growth a student made. Arizona’s Growth Model serves as a way for educators to understand how much growth a student makes relative to a student’s academic peers. More specifically, Arizona’s Growth Model essentially compares each student’s current achievement to students in the same grade throughout the state who had similar state assessment scores in past years. The model then produces a student growth percentile. This score has some things in common with the children’s height and weight percentiles that pediatricians share with parents. Percentile scores have a relatively straightforward interpretation: A child that is in the 76th percentile in weight is heavy as or heavier than 76% of other children of the same age. But this is not a measure of growth, just a spot measurement of how much above or below the average a particular child is. In terms of Arizona’s Growth Model, a student growth percentile of 60 indicates the student grew as well or better than 60% of her academic peers. It is not about how that recent test score compares to all the other test scores. Even students with test scores that are very low can receive high growth scores.

The test score data underlying these student growth percentiles are not perfectly precise, because they contain measurement error, so the growth percentiles themselves are in turn also not perfectly precise. A student with a growth percentile of 63 may not actually be growing significantly faster than another student with a 60. In a similar way, even though you might not be able to reliably discern a 63-decibel sound from a 60-decibel one, you can still easily categorize different sounds as soft, normal, or loud – finer-grained comparisons are hard to make. For this reason, student growth percentiles are categorized by “low,” “typical,” or “high” growth – we can be pretty sure about these large differences, even if small differences may not be reliable or meaningful.

What does the Arizona’s Growth Model tell us?

The Arizona’s Growth Model tells us how individual students (and groups of students) progress from year to year toward state standards. Each student’s progress is compared to the progress of other students in the state with a similar score history on state assessments in that subject area. Schools and LEAs that produce the highest rates of growth in academic achievement may not be the ones with the highest test scores every year – growth level is completely independent of achievement level for individual students.

What do all of these acronyms mean?

%P Percent Passing
AIMS Arizona’s Instrument to Measure Standards
AIMS A Arizona’s Instrument to Measure Standards Alternate
Alt School Alternative School
AMAO Annual Measurable Achievement Objective
AMO Annual Measurable Objective
AOI Arizona Online Instruction
AZELLA Arizona English Language Learner Assessment
BQ Bottom 25%
CCRI College and Career Ready Index
CY Current Year
DO Rate Dropout Rate
ELL English Language Learner
ESSA Every Student Succeeds Act
FAME Falls Far Below; Approaches; Meets; Exceeds
FAY Full Academic Year
FFB Falls Far Below
FY Fiscal Year
NR Not Rated
PY Prior Year
SGP Student Growth Percentile
SS Scale Score

ELL Accountability (2)

Why are students who previously tested proficient on AZELLA showing up on my SDELL73 report?

Please verify the Integrity results for students who you believe should not be showing up on your SDELL73 report. Students who have no integrity result may not be captured correctly in available reports.

Why didn’t my ELL amendment request get approved?

Amendment requests were implemented in order to correct student information or status where no other method exists for the school or LEA. These instances are not common since most issues may be resolved with proper data management or student assessment. ADE does not amend student status if the amendment would adversely impact the student (i.e., removing the student from the requirement to test when the student has a documented ELL need and program in the current year and should continue services in the next year) or cause the student to be misclassified. These are some examples of amendment requests which are not granted:

 Didn’t know the student “was ELL” (Check SDELL70 upon enrollment or SDELL73 regularly)

 Student “was SPED” (Submit IEP team decision to SPED withdraw each year; also, documented SPED need in SAIS is required)

 Please add FEP student who completed reassessment (Monitor FEP students using methods other than AZELLA reassessment since these students are not required to reassess)

 Student had a valid SPED withdrawal and SPED need in current year (These students are classified as Group 3 and would not have reassessed; however, if a Group 3 student completes reassessment, the reassessment is added to their test history report. Since the school reassessed the student to produce a valid scale score, the score will be used for both the student’s test history and the school’s ELL accountability.)

 Student took Placement test on or after Jan. 1, 2015 (If the placement test was their first assessment in FY15, these students will not be counted in the ELL “95% tested” calculation denominator so their subsequent SDELL73 status will be based on their placement test score.)

Finding Data (4)

Where do I find graduation rates for 4 to 7-year cohorts for the 2015 year?

There is a lag time between when rates are calculated and graduation date depending on 4, 5, 6, or 7-year cohort. A time table and a brief description are shown below. The corresponding files for the fiscal accountability year can be found here.

Because four-year graduates may graduate after the fiscal year their cohort year ends, all graduation data are lagged by one year every year. For each fiscal year’s accountability determination, the four year rate would measure the prior fiscal year’s cohort graduation; however, the prior fiscal year’s cohort can represent both the four and five year rate based on the date of graduation. For instance, Cohort 2012 four-year graduates graduated as of August 31, 2012; any students who remain in school after August 31, 2012 and graduate before June 30, 2013 would be considered a five-year graduate. Accountability for each fiscal year and the subsequent cohort rates are de- scribed below unless indicated otherwise:

Originally we were told we would receive SGP data in January. Is there a plan to share the SGP data from AzMERIT soon?

ADE has delayed indefinitely the issuing of any student growth percentile (SGP) scores based on the Spring 2015 AzMERIT assessment. ADE engages and will continue to engage with national and local experts on both the policy and technical requirements related to accountability for student growth. ADE wants to ensure students, parents, teachers, principals, and all other stakeholders receive statistically defensible estimates of student growth based on Arizona’s new statewide assessment. ADE will release more information regarding the availability of a student growth measure based on AzMERIT results as it becomes available.

 

I’m looking for testing data for Fiscal Year 2015. Where can I find that?

Detailed instructions on how to access and download data can be found in the new ADEConnect Guide. However, ADE did not upload all testing data for fiscal year 2015. SB1289 suspended A-F Letter Grades for fiscal years 2015 and 2016. Entities can find student level testing data in their respective Vendor files (AIMS/Pearson and AzMERIT/American Institutes for Research).

Where can I find 2015 AIMS & AIMS A Science results for the state?

Schools and LEAs can download student-level information from ADEConnect —> Accountability —> AIMS Data Download. Statewide performance results are located here.

Full Academic Year (FAY) (2)

With the AIMS test and letter grade calculation, students were counted if they were enrolled in a school within the first 10 days and then continuously enrolled until the test date. Will those same criteria be used with AzMERIT? Where can I find the documentation?

There is no new definition or guidance on “Full Academic Year” based on the new assessment at this time. We will disseminate this information as soon as it has been established/finalized; the ADE and our technical advisory group will review potential implications of the new assessment on the previous definition in the next few weeks.

How will the data released after the embargo differ from what is used for Accountability purposes?

Data used for any state or federal accountability measures will apply business rules such as FAY, concurrent enrolment, etc.

Graduation/Dropout Rate (6)

Do homeschool students count in my graduation rate?

If the LEA receives state tuition or generates ADM for this student, the student will be counted in the cohort until the student withdraws or exits using a graduation or exit code which qualifies him for removal from the cohort. This manual provides the business rules associated with the calculation of the graduation rate.

Does a student need to delay graduation if they finish their last class and are ready graduate in February or March?

This is a local decision once the LEA determines a student has met all graduation requirements. Typically if a student graduates midyear, he or she is withdrawn with a W7 (graduation midyear) code.

 

Since graduation requirements related to AIMS changed in 2014, is there an updated graduation rate technical manual available yet?

Achieve has updated the “Grad, Dropout, and Persistence Rate Technical Manual” (July 2015) with the most current business rules and posted it on the technical assistance/resources page of the Accountability website.

Where do I find graduation rates for 4 to 7-year cohorts for the 2015 year?

There is a lag time between when rates are calculated and graduation date depending on 4, 5, 6, or 7-year cohort. A time table and a brief description are shown below. The corresponding files for the fiscal accountability year can be found here.

Because four-year graduates may graduate after the fiscal year their cohort year ends, all graduation data are lagged by one year every year. For each fiscal year’s accountability determination, the four year rate would measure the prior fiscal year’s cohort graduation; however, the prior fiscal year’s cohort can represent both the four and five year rate based on the date of graduation. For instance, Cohort 2012 four-year graduates graduated as of August 31, 2012; any students who remain in school after August 31, 2012 and graduate before June 30, 2013 would be considered a five-year graduate. Accountability for each fiscal year and the subsequent cohort rates are de- scribed below unless indicated otherwise:

Other Accountability (3)

Where can I find information about the Every Student Succeeds Act?

The U.S. Department of Education has posted a set of Frequently Asked Questions concerning the transition and full implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) here. More resources can be found here.

What does school and district accountability look like in other states?

This resource describes the measures, labels, and requirements other states use in their accountability systems. Some of them are similar to Arizona’s; others are not.

Does the Department have a process in place to address accountability “gaming”?

The Department’s efforts to protect the integrity of the accountability system are described here and here.

Schools, Districts, and Charters (7)

Will high schools be negatively impacted if an incoming freshman completes an EOC in middle school?

Since AzMERIT is only in its second year, students can take remaining EOC tests in high school. One or two EOC tests taken while in middle school would not adversely impact the high school. The EOC tests taken in middle school count toward that middle school’s annual proficiency rate. Student achievement results remain with the school which administered the assessment in the year it was given.

Do charter schools get letter grades?

For school years prior and up to 2013-2014, yes. All Arizona public schools, both charter and district, received letter grades.

My school received an A in 2014. Can I keep up my banner?

Schools which received an A for the 2013-2014 school year must display the year when displaying outdated achievement information as required by state statute. This applies to schools which choose to display any letter grade from the 2013-2014 school year or any previous year.

Where is the Arizona’s Measure of Academic Progress form located for extremely small schools and schools with insufficient data?

Schools which did not receive any letter grade for the 2013-2014 school year can access the form here: http://www.azed.gov/accountability/files/2015/06/measure-of-academic-progress.pdf . Charter schools which did not receive any 2013-2014 A-F letter grades do not have to submit or complete any additional information or reports for accountability at this time.

Does my child’s school have a letter grade?

For school years prior and up to 2013-2014, yes. More information on specific schools can be found here.

Arizona Report Cards

What is FAY?

Full Academic Year (FAY)

Some measures require all students to be included in the calculation whereas others hold schools accountable only for those in attendance for a full academic year.

For 2014, how will a school’s persistence rate be calculated?

For any student whose prior year end of year code indicates they are eligible to persist (e.g. Graduates and Completers are not eligible), the student counts as a persistent student if he/she enrolls in ANY Arizona public school prior to or on October 1st. Students who enroll are divided by the number of students who were eligible to enroll according to their last school.

Students (5)

Is there any length of time which a student must be enrolled, before the school/district can consider the student meeting the requirements and be eligible for graduation?

No. A student can graduate as soon as the school/LEA verifies their credits/eligibility. A midyear graduate is coded as a W7. The school should not attempt to change End of year status for prior fiscal years based on this year’s graduation code.

If a student completes a class in one district but is enrolled in another during the test dates, who is responsible for testing that student?

Either school can assess the student, however for accountability purposes ADE will look at which school the student is enrolled in.

 

Should we test Grade 9 and/or 10 students since only Grade 11 students count on AzMERIT test participation calculation for high schools?

YES. Schools should administer the appropriate EOC test when students are exposed to corresponding content regardless of their grade level. Most Grade 9 and 10 students take high school level English/Language Arts and Mathematics content. The school’s percent proficient rate will be based on all students (in all grades) who complete AzMERIT. Some Grade 11 students will not take an EOC test, but their participation from Grade 9 or 10 would be captured for school accountability.

How can I get my transfer students’ test history report(s) for AzMERIT results similar to the student test history report which was available for AIMS since this student tested at a different school last year and AIR will not be sending me their results?

The accountability application in ADEConnect and/or Common Logon will not contain any AzMERIT data on October 6. Schools can access test history results on their currently enrolled students via AZDash.

Technical Assistance (5)

Where can I find 2015 AIMS & AIMS A Science results for the state?

Schools and LEAs can download student-level information from ADEConnect —> Accountability —> AIMS Data Download. Statewide performance results are located here.

Why didn’t my ELL amendment request get approved?

Amendment requests were implemented in order to correct student information or status where no other method exists for the school or LEA. These instances are not common since most issues may be resolved with proper data management or student assessment. ADE does not amend student status if the amendment would adversely impact the student (i.e., removing the student from the requirement to test when the student has a documented ELL need and program in the current year and should continue services in the next year) or cause the student to be misclassified. These are some examples of amendment requests which are not granted:

 Didn’t know the student “was ELL” (Check SDELL70 upon enrollment or SDELL73 regularly)

 Student “was SPED” (Submit IEP team decision to SPED withdraw each year; also, documented SPED need in SAIS is required)

 Please add FEP student who completed reassessment (Monitor FEP students using methods other than AZELLA reassessment since these students are not required to reassess)

 Student had a valid SPED withdrawal and SPED need in current year (These students are classified as Group 3 and would not have reassessed; however, if a Group 3 student completes reassessment, the reassessment is added to their test history report. Since the school reassessed the student to produce a valid scale score, the score will be used for both the student’s test history and the school’s ELL accountability.)

 Student took Placement test on or after Jan. 1, 2015 (If the placement test was their first assessment in FY15, these students will not be counted in the ELL “95% tested” calculation denominator so their subsequent SDELL73 status will be based on their placement test score.)

Why are students who previously tested proficient on AZELLA showing up on my SDELL73 report?

Please verify the Integrity results for students who you believe should not be showing up on your SDELL73 report. Students who have no integrity result may not be captured correctly in available reports.

When should we code students as SC or SE now that SA does not apply?

See this resource on graduation codes. If a Cohort 2014 student (or any student) is graduating in FY2015 or later, the SA code would not apply. The SC or SE code could apply based on whatever an IEP team determines to be the requirements for a particular student to graduate. Beginning last year, the SA code would not apply for high schools until Civics becomes a requirement for graduation in 2017.

What happens if ADEConnect isn’t working for me?

If you have issues opening Reports or data on ADEConnect, please clear your cache, close your browser, and re-open. Be sure to always logout when leaving ADEConnect (rather than simply closing your browser or tab). Additionally, ADEConnect performs best in Internet Explorer. If the problem still persists, please contact Achieve or ADE Support.