Thursday Sessions

logoThursday, December 12, 2013

Session I | Session II | Session III Session IV | Thursday At-a-Glance | Thursday Bios

Please note that links with content are colored in Red!

 

Registration and Breakfast    7:00 AM- 8:00 AM

Breakout Session I     8:00 AM – 9:15 AM

Getting students to talk in class is easy, right? At least until we want them to talk about the content they are learning! How do we get students to talk about academic content when they are still learning to describe their family? Developing proficiency in the academic language of school requires multiple opportunities to listen, speak, read and write about academic subjects. This session is designed to help middle and high school teachers plan units that integrate listening, speaking, reading writing and thinking in meaningful ways. The presenter will highlight the connections between the English Language Proficiency Standards and the Common Core State Standards, using them as resources to plan instruction. Through active participation, video clips and discussion, participants will leave this session with a toolkit of engaging and relevant ways to integrate instruction of academic vocabulary and language across a rigorous, grade-level curriculum. This presentation is especially useful for middle and high school teachers.

Carol Rothenberg
Tucson A-B

This seminar focuses on teacher strategies that help move ELLs beyond basic writing skills. It focuses primarily on “basic” level ELL writers and gives participants clear teaching strategies that build student writing capacity at this level. Participants will come away with an understanding of how the strategies work and how to implement them effectively in their classrooms.

Rob Robertson, Arizona Science Center
Tucson C-D

Learning grammar rules and then applying them in spontaneous writing is the apogee of second language mastery. This session shows in detail two methods for getting students to move from reciting rules and formulas to applying them in writing. It’s not easy, but it works!

Heidi Rochin
Tucson E
Handout

Students and teachers need clear ways to link the power of ELD instructional methods to language arts instruction. See specific ways to bridge this gap and watch more kids light up when they understand how grammar impacts reading comprehension and academic writing.

Bradley Williams
Tucson F
Handout

This session will describe similarities and differences in the achievement patterns and characteristics of groups of Arizona EL students during a six-year period (SY 2006/07 – 2011/12): ELs who reclassified as fluent English proficient compared to those EL students who did not and EL students who reclassified as fluent English proficient and passed the AIMS ELA test and those RFEPs who did not pass the AIMS ELA test. The results of these analyses will inform discussion on effective practices for addressing the needs of long-term EL students and reclassified EL students who continue to struggle in the transition into mainstream classrooms.

Eric Haas, Senior Research Associate, WestEd
Tucson G-H

This session will focus on one of the major shifts of Arizona’s Common Core Standards–the need for close reading. In this session, we’ll model six new during-reading strategies that help all readers, but especially struggling readers and English language learners, read texts with deeper understanding. These strategies are appropriate for grades K-12 (with modifications that will be shared). We will also discuss how these strategies shift when moving from fiction to nonfiction.

Kylene Beers, Bob Probst
Tucson I-J

Let’s explore the building blocks of words: prefixes, suffixes, and roots for our ELL students. These fascinating little units of language — called morphemes — are addressed in Arizona’s English Language Proficiency Standards and Arizona’s Common Core Standards. What must a reader do to infer word meaning while reading independently? Pay attention to clues inside the word (prefixes, etc.) and to clues outside the word (context). We will consider how various teaching strategies and sample lessons align with Arizona’s ELP and Common Core Standards. Participants will gain valuable insights for boosting vocabulary and facilitating word reading and spelling.

Susan Ebbers
Arizona 8-9
Handout

Junk food: Should it be sold in school? Should students be paid to do well in school? Today’s news: information or entertainment? Should students be required to learn a second language? In this workshop you will learn how to develop academic language through student-to-student discourse in an S.E.I. listening and speaking block as well as math, social studies, and science content classes. Academic language discussion enhances almost any lesson. Strategies include teacher talk moves that use questioning to enhance student engagement, teaching students to question, clarify, build-onto an argument, and present evidence-based counter arguments. Additional strategies include guiding students to create, clarify, fortify, and negotiate their ideas using academic language.
When students can discuss issues using academic language and articulate arguments with claims, reasoning and evidence, they can read essays and persuasive text with more thoughtfulness and write about these topics with more clarity. Research in this area is demonstrating that these academic discussions are particularly effective for ELL students (Snow et al, 2010). E.L.P. and A.C.C.R. standards reflect this research with curriculum and instruction shifts that bring a new focus to interdisciplinary academic language development and argumentative reasoning.

Erin Ruegg, Isaac Public Schools
Arizona 10-11

Close reading means analyzing a text and then drawing conclusions and making decisions based on your analysis. This session will support participants in applying the goals of the close reading routine using mathematical text. This session will be particularly useful to primary teachers.

Tracy Fazio, K-12 Academic Standards, ADE
San Luis I & II



Breakout Session II   9:30 AM – 10:45 AM

English language learners must do “double the work” – learning the content while they are still learning the language. In middle and high school especially, where the language demands are high, this is a tall order for both teachers and students. The Common Core State Standards are clear – content area teachers must integrate a focus on literacy in their instruction. For teachers of ELL students, this means helping students learn abstract and complex concepts as well as the language they need to talk, read and write about them. In this session participants engage in a variety of ways to integrate instruction of academic vocabulary and language across a rigorous, grade-level curriculum. This presentation is especially suited for middle and high school teachers.

Carol Rothenberg
Tucson A-B
PowerPoint

This seminar focuses on teacher strategies that help move ELLs beyond basic writing skills. It focuses primarily on “basic” level ELL writers and gives participants clear teaching strategies that build student writing capacity at this level. Participants will come away with an understanding of how the strategies work and how to implement them effectively in their classroom.

Rob Robertson, Arizona Science Center
Tucson C-D

Getting people to change a long-practiced behavior is difficult work. Each of the state’s language acceleration principles ask teachers to do new things and to stop doing old things. Learn and practice key coaching interventions that really help teachers to improve their teaching performance.

Kevin Clark, Heidi Rochin
Tucson E
Handout

Teaching students to speak English can seem paradoxically simple yet amazingly complicated. Learn 10 ways to get kids talking about academic topics that have them practicing important pronunciation elements that are critical to English mastery.

Bradley Williams
Tucson F
Handout

This session will focus on state and federal accountability. A-F letter grades and how to earn the 3 ELL points will be discussed with an emphasis on who is included in each criterion (i.e., n count, 95% tested, and reclassification). In addition, we will focus on AMAOs, including current and proposed changes. This session will be an in-depth discussion particularly useful for administrators.

Jen Marmo, Research Associate, ADE
Arizona 10-11
Handout

This session (and Part II) will focus on two other major shifts of Arizona’s Common Core Standards–the need for more rigor (complex texts) and the use of text-dependent questions. In this session, we’ll look at these shifts and model strategies that help students as we present more and more complex texts and focus more and more on text-dependent questions. The strategies presented in this session are based on best-practice research of English language learners and are appropriate for nonfiction and fiction, grades 4-12.

Kylene Beers, Bob Probst
Tucson I-J

This session includes an interactive mix of modeling, lecture, and practice. The goal is to develop vocabulary embedded in language – focusing not only on words, but also on usage, words contextualized in phrases and sentences. This aligns particularly with Arizona’s English Language Proficiency Standards, but also with Arizona’s Common Core Standards. To become confident and competent with words and phrases, English language learners – and indeed all students — benefit from a highly vocalized lesson design. If the pronunciation is complex, students need to practice saying it aloud, with feedback. According to research, they also need context and a simple definition, supported by examples and non-examples, possibly reinforced with graphic organizers and morphological families, such as predict, predictable, unpredictable, predictability, unpredictability. In addition, learners need an opportunity to generate their own sentences – to use the word in both speech and print. Can all of this be accomplished in a lesson design that is fairly brief, highly interactive, and rich in oral language? Yes. Let’s learn how.

Susan Ebbers
Arizona 8-9
PowerPoint

The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) is committed to the creation of an assessment that’s both accessible and fair for all students. Elements of Universal Design have guided development of items from inception. Passages have been selected for universal appeal and reflect a respect for a wide diversity of cultures. Accessibility features will allow students to customize their assessment experience, and ELL teams will be able to develop personal needs profiles to tailor the assessment to individual student needs. In addition, accommodations have been identified that will help to level the playing field for those ELL students who need additional supports to access the assessment. Please join me to discuss the PARCC Assessment as it relates to the EL student, review sample items, examine the text complexity tool, and check timelines and online delivery updates.

Tamara Reavis, Achieve, Inc.
Arizona 10-11
PowerPoint
PARCC Assessment Items
PARCC Sample Items

Close reading means analyzing a text and then drawing conclusions and making decisions based on your analysis. This session will support particpants in applying the goals of the close reading routine using mathematical text in the 3-5 classroom.

Tracy Fazio, Andrea Grabow; ADE
San Luis I & II



Breakout Session III    1:15 PM – 2:30 PM

Teaching students to speak English can seem paradoxically simple yet amazingly complicated. Learn 10 ways to get kids talking about academic topics that have them practicing important pronunciation elements that are critical to English mastery.

Bradley Williams
Tucson A-B
Handout

This session will provide participants with an overview of the Office of English Language Acquisition Service’s monitoring process. An overview of the process from the initial notification to the final report will be a part of this presentation.
Participants will understand the district selection, file review, and classroom observation process involved with OELAS monitoring process.

OELAS Monitoring Team, ADE
Tucson C-D

In this session, we continue the discussion begun in Session 2 by sharing more strategies. Again, we’ll share strategies that help students read both fiction and nonfiction primarily in grades 3-12. As with Session 2, the strategies we share come from a body of research on what is effective in English language learner classrooms.

Kylene Beers, Bob Probst
Tucson E

Both the English Language Proficiency and Arizona’s Common Core Standards require students to read and write a variety of texts as well as develop language skills so that they can interact orally about the texts. Oral Language communication skills are critical for all students but are especially important for children learning English as they are learning to read and write. This session will demonstrate a variety of lesson frameworks which teachers can adapt to their own texts and materials. Each of the frameworks engages students in reading a text, structured discussion about that text and writing a structured summary or opinion piece related to that text. This session will be particularly useful to primary teachers.

Patricia Cunningham
Tucson F
Handout

This session will encompass an overview of SAIS data and ELL reports. Specifically, it will include an abbreviated discussion regarding the 70, 71, and 72 reports on common logon, information regarding the OCR/DOJ Directive, and use of a growth model to study and comprehend ELL students and their success, are a few of the topics to be discussed. Q&A will follow.

Jen Marmo, Micky Gutier; OELAS
Tucson G-H
Handout

Getting people to change a long-practiced behavior is difficult work. Each of the state’s language acceleration principles ask teachers to do new things and to stop doing old things. Learn and practice key coaching interventions that really help teachers to improve their teaching performance.

Kevin Clark, Heidi Rochin
Tucson I-J
Handout

Let’s explore the building blocks of words: prefixes, suffixes, and roots for our ELL students. These fascinating little units of language — called morphemes — are addressed in Arizona’s English Language Proficiency Standards and Arizona’s Common Core Standards. What must a reader do to infer word meaning while reading independently? Pay attention to clues inside the word (prefixes, etc.) and to clues outside the word (context). We will consider how various teaching strategies and sample lessons align with Arizona’s ELP and Common Core Standards. Participants will gain valuable insights for boosting vocabulary and facilitating word reading and spelling.

Susan Ebbers
Arizona 8-9
Handout

The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) is committed to the creation of an assessment that’s both accessible and fair for all students. Elements of Universal Design have guided development of items from inception. Passages have been selected for universal appeal and reflect a respect for a wide diversity of cultures. Accessibility features will allow students to customize their assessment experience, and ELL teams will be able to develop personal needs profiles to tailor the assessment to individual student needs. In addition, accommodations have been identified that will help to level the playing field for those ELL students who need additional supports to access the assessment. Please join me to discuss the PARCC Assessment as it relates to the EL student, review sample items, examine the text complexity tool, and check timelines and online delivery updates.

Tamara Reavis, Achieve, Inc.
Arizona 10-11
PowerPoint
PARCC Assessment Items
PARCC Sample Items

This session will support participants in facilitating academic discussions utilizing mathematical vocabulary through the problem solving process. This session will be particularly useful to teachers in grades 6-12.

Frankie Sullivan; K-12 Academic Standards, ADE
San Luis I & II

Breakout Session IV    2:45 PM – 4:00 PM

Using ELD Methods to Move ELA Instruction Forward (repeat session)

Students and teachers need clear ways to link the power of ELD instructional methods to language arts instruction. See specific ways to bridge this gap and watch more kids light up when they understand how grammar impacts reading comprehension and academic writing.

Bradley Williams
Tucson A-B
Handout

Academic Parent-Teacher Teams (APTT) is a research-based family engagement model that has set a new standard for parent-teacher collaboration. Developed by Maria C. Paredes in 2009, APTT repurposes traditional parent-teacher conferences into collaborative, dynamic classroom teams committed to exceeding academic standards. With coaching from the classroom teacher, parents are knowledgeable and feel confident with grade level academic learning goals, student progress data, home learning activities, setting achievement goals, and building collaborative relationships with other parents in the class. In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of APTT and hear about overcoming implementation challenges.

Maria Paredes, WestEd
Tucson C-D

In this session, we’ll turn our attention to another shift of the CCSS–the need for more academic vocabulary. We’ll share strategies that help students with the demands of tier 2 and tier 3 vocabulary. The strategies we share will focus on how to help English language learners connect tier 1 vocabulary to tiers 2 and 3.

Kylene Beers, Bob Probst
Tucson E

The number of words with which students can associate appropriate meanings is highly correlated with their comprehension of text. Recognizing that from third grade on students gain most of their new word meanings from reading, both the ELP and Common Core Standards require that students learn how to use context, picture and morphemic clues to figure out meanings of words. This session will demonstrate lesson frameworks which explicitly teach students how to independently acquire word meanings from text so that every reading opportunity becomes fodder for increasing their store of English word meanings. This session is particularly useful for primary teachers.

Patricia Cunningham
Tucson F
Handout

This session will describe similarities and differences in the achievement patterns and characteristics of groups of Arizona EL students during a six-year period (SY 2006/07 – 2011/12): ELs who reclassified as fluent English proficient compared to those EL students who did not and EL students who reclassified as fluent English proficient and passed the AIMS ELA test and those RFEPs who did not pass the AIMS ELA test. The results of these analyses will inform discussion on effective practices for addressing the needs of long-term EL students and reclassified EL students who continue to struggle in the transition into mainstream classrooms.

Eric Haas, Senior Research Associate, WestEd
Tucson G-H

If you want to know who is really doing the language work in a classroom, come to this session and learn readily applicable tools and strategies for improving the quantity and quality of student discourse.

Kevin Clark
Tucson I-J
Handout

This session includes an interactive mix of modeling, lecture, and practice. The goal is to develop vocabulary embedded in language – focusing not only on words, but also on usage, words contextualized in phrases and sentences. This aligns particularly with Arizona’s English Language Proficiency Standards, but also with Arizona’s Common Core Standards. To become confident and competent with words and phrases, English language learners – and indeed all students — benefit from a highly vocalized lesson design. If the pronunciation is complex, students need to practice saying it aloud, with feedback. According to research, they also need context and a simple definition, supported by examples and non-examples, possibly reinforced with graphic organizers and morphological families, such as predict, predictable, unpredictable, predictability, unpredictability. In addition, learners need an opportunity to generate their own sentences – to use the word in both speech and print. Can all of this be accomplished in a lesson design that is fairly brief, highly interactive, and rich in oral language? Yes. Let’s learn how.

Susan Ebbers
Arizona 8-9
PowerPoint

Educator evaluations have changed a great deal in Arizona in the last two years. Now more than ever, superintendents and principals need to be skilled in the process of gathering and basing their evaluations of principals and teachers on evidence they have collected of an educator’s performance. This session will focus on the difference between evidence and opinion, and how to eliminate the latter when describing performance. There will be opportunities for audience interaction in pairs, small groups, and whole group settings to help identify and work with these two ways that teachers’ evaluations are typically based. When participants leave the session, they will have a clear understanding of the difference between evidence and opinion and their place in the evaluation process.

Steve Larson; Teacher/Principal Evaluation, ADE
Arizona 10-11

What is the secret to writing tightly organized paragraphs and essays? The answer is Triple Gold Sentences!
The Triple Gold Sentence is a sentence with three parts that can be expanded into a tightly organized paragraph or even a college style, five-paragraph essay!
“Triple Golders” teaches a fundamental writing skill: dividing a topic into logical parts. Thus, “Triple Golders” represents one of writing’s most difficult challenges, which is organization.
“Triple Golders” scaffolding follows this writing pattern:
Triple Gold Sentence
Triple Gold Paragraph
Triple Gold Micro Essay
Triple Gold Essay
In this session, participants will discover how even Kindergarten ELL students can successfully master writing a Triple Gold Paragraph and/or Triple Gold Micro Essay. Participants will understand how to utilize sentence frames and color-coding to assist students with organization in writing. Whether a student is a beginning writer or on the road to becoming proficient, this session will provide another tool for the teacher to assist students in writing.

Deb Weigel, Desert View Academy
San Luis I & II
Handout