Friday Sessions

 

   logo Friday, December 13, 2013

Session I | Session II  | Friday At-a-Glance | Friday Bios

Please note that links with content are colored in Red!

Registration and Breakfast      7:00 AM- 8:00 AM

Welcome, Announcements, Keynote      8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

In this session Dr. Susan Hall will discuss key principles of effective instruction as described in an article written by Barak Rosenshine that appeared in an AFT journal, American Educator. Although these ideas are not new, they are especially important when working with English language learners. The 10 principles are: 1. Begin with a review of previous learning; 2. Present new material in small steps with practice; 3. Ask questions and check responses; 4. Provide modeling; 5. Guide student practice; 6. Check for student understanding; 7. Obtain a high success rate; 8. Provide scaffolds; 9. Monitor independent practice; 10. Engage in periodic review. Video segments will be shown to examine principles.

Susan Hall
Arizona Ballroom
Handout

Breakout Session I       9:15 AM – 10:30 AM

Engaging children in conversations fosters cognitive and social development for children.
These benefits are greatly impacted by the quality of what is said in the conversation.
So, understanding that having extended conversations with children supports their cognitive development and increases positive interactions, the objective of this workshop is to:
1. Learn the key elements of meaningful conversations with young children
2. Identify the benefits of teachers engaging in conversations with young children
3. Understand strategies teachers can use to engage children in conversations
4. Identify opportunities in the classroom to have conversations with children.
This session would be particularliy useful for Pre-K- grade 2 educators.

Terry Doolan, Lauren Preston; Early Childhood Education, ADE
Tucson A-B

If you want to know who is really doing the language work in a classroom, come to this session and learn readily applicable tools and strategies for improving the quantity and quality of student discourse.

Kevin Clark
Tucson C-D
Handout

Research at the Harvard Graduate School of Education has shown that ELLs make the greatest vocabulary gains when instruction includes demonstrating how to use the meaningful parts of words (roots, prefixes, and suffixes) to figure out what an unknown word means. Yet these word parts are combined differently depending upon whether they are Anglo-Saxon, Latin, or Greek. Dr. Susan Hall will model 10-minute techniques that can be used whole class or in small groups. Manipulatives will be used that show Spanish-speaking students how to distinguish the more familiar structure of Latin words from the less familiar Anglo-Saxon and Greek parts of multisyllable words. A lesson will be posted online that participants can download for immediate use in the classroom.

Susan Hall
Tucson E-F
Handout
Handout-Sample

This presentation will demonstrate for participants how to take advantage of the technology that is available to engage learners and increase learning. Participants will be shown what resources are available and how to use technology resources such as Smartboards, PowerPoints, the internet, and even a simple phone camera to bring learning to life and realia into the classroom. Video clips of actual classrooms using technology will be used to illustrate how to Get With the Program and use technology to make sure that all students are learning.

Jennifer Glueck
Tucson G-H
Handout-youtube
Handout-bookresources

Both the ELP and Common Core Standards require students to read and write a variety of different kinds of text and develop language skills so that they can interact orally about the texts. Oral Language communication skills are critical for all students but are especially important for children learning English as they are learning to read and write. This session will demonstrate a variety of lesson frameworks which teachers can adapt to their own texts and materials. Each of the frameworks engages students in reading a text, structured discussion about that text and writing a structured summary or opinion piece related to that text. This session will be particularly useful to primary teachers.

Patricia Cunningham
Tucson I-J
Handout

This presentation will provide a brief historical and legal overview of the educational systems used with students who have ‘dual labels’; that is, students identified as both requiring English language services and special educational services Although compliance is of major importance, we will emphasize collaborative instruction as a second critical layer and provide effective examples from the field. Representatives from both Exceptional Student Services and the Office of English Language Acquisition Services will co-present this session.

Gerry Haskins, Ann Brusca; ADE
Arizona 8-9
PowerPoint

What is the secret to writing tightly organized paragraphs and essays? The answer is Triple Gold Sentences!  The Triple Gold Sentence is a sentence with three parts that can be expanded into a tightly organized paragraph or even a college style, five-paragraph essay!  “Triple Golders” teaches a fundamental writing skill: dividing a topic into logical parts. Thus, “Triple Golders” represents one of writing’s most difficult challenges, which is organization. “Triple Golders” scaffolding follows this writing pattern:
Triple Gold Sentence
Triple Gold Paragraph
Triple Gold Micro Essay
Triple Gold Essay
In this session, participants will discover how even Kindergarten ELL students can successfully master writing a Triple Gold Paragraph and/or Triple Gold Micro Essay. Participants will understand how to utilize sentence frames and color-coding to assist students with organization in writing. Whether a student is a beginning writer or on the road to becoming proficient, this session will provide another tool for the teacher to assist students in writing.

Deb Weigel, Desert View Academy
Arizona 10-11
Handout

 

Breakout Session II      10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

In this interactive session participants will learn the importance of dramatic play and the teacher’s role in setting up a quality scenario. A dramatic play plan will be reviewed and participants will use the plan to develop a dramatic play scenario for their classrooms. **We will place an extra emphasis on language development**

Terry Doolan,Lauren Preston; Early Childhood Education, ADE
Tucson A-B

English language learners come to school with unique academic needs and also with unique background experiences, culture, language, personality, interests, various language proficiency levels and attitudes toward learning. Effective teachers recognize that all of these factors affect how students learn in the classroom, and they adjust, or differentiate, their instruction to meet students’ needs. Making content comprehensible for ELL students will be the focus of this session. This session will focus on supporting English language learners in accessing content by utilizing the following:
• Focusing on the whole child: unconditional positive regard
• Scaffolding techniques (pre-teaching, visual supports, sentence stems, vocabulary preview, modeling etc.)
• Student to student interaction using academic language (precision partnering)
• Differentiating based on academic and language needs (grouping, materials, etc.)

Veronica Vasquez, Gisselle Herrera; Tolleson ESD
Tucson C-D

Reading multisyllable English words is a persistent issue for many English language learners. While the consonants are more predictable, knowing whether to pronounce the long, short, or other vowel sound in the middle of a syllable is tricky. Dr. Susan Hall will model an engaging approach to showing students how to know which vowel sound to say based on recognizing the syllable type. This engaging approach involves using a gesture for each of the six syllable types and showing students how to know which way to pronounce the vowel based on the syllable type. This technique can be taught whole class for 5 minutes a day or in small groups. Participants will receive a handout with the gestures and an overview of the process, which will be shown with videos.

Susan Hall
Tucson E-F
Handout

Discover the nexus of the Ed Tech , the ELP and Common Core Standards. You will learn about grade level implementation guides and many more resources. There will be emphasis made on Listening and Speaking, Presenting and Writing and Communication and Collaboration.

Kate Wright; ADE
Tucson G-H
PowerPoint

The number of words students can associate appropriate meanings with is highly correlated with their comprehension of text. Recognizing that from third grade on students gain most of their new word meanings from reading, both the ELP and Common Core Standards require that students learn how to use context, picture and morphemic clues to figure out meanings for words. This session will demonstrate lesson frameworks which explicitly teach students how to independently acquire word meanings from text so that every reading opportunity becomes fodder for increasing their store of English word meanings. This session is particularly useful for primary teachers.

Patricia Cunningham
Tucson I-J
Handout

This session will focus on state and federal accountability. A-F letter grades and how to earn the 3 ELL points will be discussed with an emphasis on who is included in each criterion (i.e., n count, 95% tested, and reclassification). In addition, we will focus on AMAOs, including current and proposed changes. This session will be an in-depth discussion particularly useful for administrators.

Jen Marmo, Research Associate, ADE
Arizona 8-9
Handout

Ready to start units but don’t know where to begin? Unsure if you have quality resources for your ELLs? Want to collaborate with your mainstream colleagues but not sure how?
This session is for anyone wanting to learn more about developing and evaluating K-2 instructional units/lessons with English language learners in mind. A team of Arizona SEI teachers gathered to develop instructional units focused on language while meeting the requirements of the SEI Models and supported with content. Join us as we share the process for using a rubric similar to the one used by your mainstream colleagues to evaluate quality and prepare SEI classrooms for the demands of college and career ready.

Inez Ramirez, Angela Ebner
Arizona 10-11
PowerPoint