What’s New

What’s New

The following information provides the latest research, data, resources, and training opportunities available for schools in drug and violence prevention.

  1. Resources from the 2013 Safe and Supportive Schools Conference:
    Prevention – Intervention – Response
  2. The “Top 10 Things Schools Can Do” to make a safer school
  3. 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey
  4. Bullying Research
  5. School Safety & Prevention Training Opportunities
  6. Clearinghouses and Resources for Drug and Violence Prevention

1. Resources from the 2013 Safe and Supportive Schools Conference:

 

 

December 4, 2013

8:30 – 8:45 Welcome
John Huppenthal, Superintendent of Public Instruction

8:45 – 10:30 General Session
One Year After Sandy Hook: What Have We Learned?
Kenneth S. Trump, National School Safety and Security Services

Putting It All Together: The Continuum of School Safety
Dr. Kris Bosworth, University of Arizona

10:45 – 12:15 Breakout Sessions

This presentation described how academics and behavior mutually influence each other and how a three-tiered model for Response to Intervention (RTI), including Universal Screening, Progress Monitoring and Intervention Planning, provides the best outcomes for students. It also looked at the implementation of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) and how PBIS and RTI work together to contribute to prevention and early identification of academic or behavior difficulties. Interventions were also discussed.
John Balles, Ph.D., Clinical Services Coordinator, Scottsdale Unified School District
Resource: Two Sides of the Pyramid: Linking RTI and PBIS (PDF)
Participants in this workshop came away with:
• a brief overview of the rational of threat management as a major component of creating a safe, supportive school
• a reminder of transient versus substantive threats and the decision to move forward with a full threat assessment or not
• a review of what should be included in an effective threat management plan
Gina Durbin, Director, Education and Community Services, Cave Creek Unified School District
Debi Neat, Safe and Drug Free Schools Trainer, Phoenix Union High School District
Participants learned the most significant constitutional issues and statutes impacting school safety, including search and seizure, interviewing of students by law enforcement, sharing of protected student information, and mandatory reporting.
Andrew Swann, Special Policy Advisory for Law Enforcement, Arizona Attorney General’s Office
Resource: School Safety and the Law (PDF)
Participants learned how to manage incidents of all sizes using the Incident Command System (ICS) and how to increase and decrease the size of response by participating in tabletop exercises.
John Shikany, Director of Safety and Security, Washington Elementary School District
Resource: Incident Command System – Practical Application (PDF)
How to stay ahead in a world on digital steroids, tips for communicating proactively with parents on school safety, and “must have” aspects of your school crisis communications plans.
Kenneth Trump, MPA, President, National School Safety and Security Services

12:15 – 1:00 Lunch – Recognition of Arizona School Emergency Response Advisory Council

1:15 – 2:45 Breakout Sessions

Participants attending this session will understand what bullying and cyberbullying are and the potential emotional, psychological, and behavioral consequences; know the latest findings on prevalence rates; be informed about research-based best practices for prevention, intervention, and response strategies; have an overview of legal considerations and standards; and learn how to work with others to help create a safe school climate. Participants will be provided with a “Top 10” of helpful websites and resources on bullying, cyberbullying, and school climate.
Jenny Walker, Ph.D., President, Cyberbullying Consulting, Ltd.
Resource: Bullying, Cyberbullying, and School Climate 101 (PDF)
Student behavior and mental health are community-wide challenges. Several Arizona districts have developed working relationships with community behavioral health providers that result in improved communication and coordination. Participants in this workshop will learn about the successful strategies, referral protocols, and models for coordination of care that ultimately lead to improved outcomes for students.
John Balles, Ph.D., Clinical Services Coordinator, Scottsdale Unified School District
Debi Neat, Safe and Drug Free Schools Trainer, Phoenix Union High School District
Resource: Achieving Mental Health Outcomes for Students (PDF)
A growing body of evidence demonstrates an alarming relationship between widespread school suspensions and expulsions and involvement in the justice system. Today’s schools, courts, law enforcement and communities require new thinking about how to positively approach discipline when children violate boundaries and policies in school. This session will provide the knowledge schools, districts, and law enforcement need to better understand the issues surrounding traditional school discipline practices and what can realistically be done to change them.
Greta Colombi, Deputy Director, National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments
Resource: Keep Kids in School (PDF)
Arizona Revised Statutes 15-341 requires that district schools have emergency response plans that meet state minimum requirements. This session will review the minimum requirements, which were revised earlier this year, and present the plethora of free training and other tools available to assist educators on developing high-quality plans.
Jean Ajamie, Director, School Safety and Prevention, Arizona Department of Education
Linda Mason, Emergency Preparedness Advisor
Resource: Meeting the Minimum Requirements for School Emergency Response Plans (PDF)
This workshop reviewed how the Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) framework impacts school campuses. This presentation reviewed the basics of PBIS and its connection to school climate. The high schools highlighted in this workshop are recipients of the Safe and Supportive Schools grant. Their stories will be shared as a means of providing examples of how PBIS sets the stage for a school climate that prioritizes learning by establishing positive learning environments. Participants will leave this workshop with an understanding of the model’s real-world impact, along with best practices that have been utilized by school staff members.
Sara Agostinho, District Prevention Coordinator, Tolleson Union High School District
Resource: Connecting With Our Youth – Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PDF)
New drug use trends burst on the scene rapidly. The more informed we are, the more we can affect positive change in our youth. This workshop will provide an overview of the signs and symptoms displayed by students who may be abusing substances. Information on current trends, to include illegal substances, new designer drugs, synthetics, over the counter and prescription drugs will be presented. In addition, new methods of ingestion and concealment will be covered.
Debi LaVergne, Safe and Supportive Schools Coach, University of Arizona
Resource: Current Drug Trends and Identification (PDF)

3:00 – 4:15 Breakout Sessions

Participants attending this session will understand what bullying and cyberbullying are and the potential emotional, psychological, and behavioral consequences; know the latest findings on prevalence rates; be informed about research-based best practices for prevention, intervention, and response strategies; have an overview of legal considerations and standards; and learn how to work with others to help create a safe school climate. Participants will be provided with a “Top 10” of helpful websites and resources on bullying, cyberbullying, and school climate.
Jenny Walker, Ph.D., President, Cyberbullying Consulting, Ltd.
Resource: Bullying, Cyberbullying, and School Climate 101 (PDF)
A growing body of evidence demonstrates an alarming relationship between widespread school suspensions and expulsions and involvement in the justice system. Today’s schools, courts, law enforcement and communities require new thinking about how to positively approach discipline when children violate boundaries and policies in school. This session will provide the knowledge schools, districts, and law enforcement need to better understand the issues surrounding traditional school discipline practices and what can realistically be done to change them.
Greta Colombi, Deputy Director, National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments
Resource: Keep Kids in School (PDF)
Research suggests that approximately one in four children in the U.S. will experience at least one traumatic event by the age of 16. A child’s reactions to trauma can impact behavior and learning. Participants attending this session will be able to:
• Define trauma
• Explain how trauma may impact child/teen behavior and learning
• Identify characteristics of trauma-informed practices in a school setting
Shannon Cronn, N.C.S.P., Safe Schools Specialist, Scottsdale Unified School District
Barb Iversen, M.C., Program Specialist, School Safety and Prevention, Arizona Department of Education
Resource: Essential Trauma Informed Practices in Schools (PDF)
This workshop introduced three types of technology that can be useful in enhancing school safety:
• Software to facilitate communication of critical infrastructure with law enforcement
• Systems for student, staff and visitor accountability, and behavior tracking for implementation of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS)
• Emerging systems for contacting internal security and/or 911 emergency services
Paul Stebbins, Detective, Homeland Defense Bureau, Phoenix Police Department
Eric Toms, Senior K-12 Consultant, PlascoTrac
Russell Appleton, Supervisor Management and Program Analyst, Department of Homeland Security
New drug use trends burst on the scene rapidly. The more informed we are, the more we can affect positive change in our youth. This workshop will provide an overview of the signs and symptoms displayed by students who may be abusing substances. Information on current trends, to include illegal substances, new designer drugs, synthetics, over the counter and prescription drugs will be presented. In addition, new methods of ingestion and concealment will be covered.
Debi LaVergne, Safe and Supportive Schools Coach, University of Arizona
Resource: Current Drug Trends and Identification (PDF)

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3. Results from the 2013 Arizona Youth Risk Behavior Survey Arizona high school students were surveyed regarding violence, suicide, alcohol, tobacco, other drugs, sexual risks, HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, body image, diet and physical activity. This survey is used to assess and monitor behaviors that place individuals at increased risk for premature morbidity and mortality.

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4. Bullying Research

Research Opportunities

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5. School Safety & Prevention Training Opportunities

Coming Soon

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6. Clearinghouses and Resources for Drug and Violence Prevention

A. Phoenix:

The Arizona Foundation for Legal Services & Education (AZFLSE) maintains a free lending library of over 2,500 law-related education materials including videos, software, books, curricula, and lesson plans. The collection also includes new and updated books and curricula on substance abuse and bullying prevention. Contact: AZFLSE – Lending Library 4201 N. 24th Street Suite 210 Phoenix, AZ 85016 Phone: (602) 340-7366 Fax: (602) 773-3105

B. Tucson:

New and updated drug and violence prevention materials including videos, books, and curricula are also available through the Pima County School Superintendent’s Office Contact: Pima County School Superintendent’s Office Pima County Regional Support Center 6420 E. Broadway Suite A100 Tucson, AZ 85713 http://www.pimaregionalsupport.org Phone: (520) 740-8213 Fax: (520) 745-5396 Email: jaymie.jacobs@schools.pima.gov

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