Thursday

Teachers’ Institute
“ALL students, ALL Teachers”
July 10-11, 2014



Click on the Session Title to view the session description.

+ = Session handouts are posted

Thursday, July 11

7:00 – 8:00 Registration and Breakfast

8:00 – 8:15 Welcome

8:15 – 8:35 Opening Remarks: Superintendent Huppenthal

8:35 – 9:35 Keynote: Dr. Anita Archer “What Makes a Difference: TEACHERS and the Quality of Instruction” +

While teachers cannot control all student variables, we can ensure that students receive the highest quality of education from year to year, hour to hour, bell to bell. In this keynote address, Dr. Archer will review the critical, research-validated elements of quality instruction, illustrating them with examples across grades and subjects.
Handout: PowerPoint

9:35 – 9:50 Break

9:50 – 11:00 Breakout Sessions

All students should have an equal opportunity to be successful and to be prepared for college and career. To accomplish that goal, all students must have access to the general education curriculum. Come learn how to collaboratively write IEPs that allow all students with special needs access to the standards.
Audra Ahumada and Sandra Laine
Handouts:  PowerPoint, Handout 1, and Handout 2
During this session, participants will be introduced to information and guided through activities to broaden their understanding of problem behavior. The emphasis will be on what we as teachers CAN do to help students manage themselves.
Lee Stickle
Handouts: PowerPoint
Participants will engage with primary sources to learn social studies concepts. Participants will take away resources and strategies to scaffold highly complex primary sources to help students access text.
Jennifer Farrlley
Handouts: PowerPoint, Handout 1, Handout 2, and Handout 3
Participants will be introduced to the five components in the Key Vocabulary Routine (from the Keys to Literacy program), but will work closely with word-learning strategies, such as using context and word parts to learn new words. Creating a word-rich classroom that includes word play, word walls, and word histories will also be included. Active participation and hands-on instruction is required!
Karen Eades
Handouts: PowerPoint and Handout
Educators have used paraprofessionals for years, but still sometimes struggle to work effectively with them. In this interactive session, participants will discuss what parapros must know as service providers, the teacher’s role in training them, and how Arizona’s College and Career Ready Standards (AZCCRS) fit in the picture.
Jennine Davidson and Lisa Schureman-Beard
Handouts: PowerPoint
In order for teachers to be successful in the early childhood classroom, they need to be able to employ strategies for coping with challenging behaviors in children. In this session, participants will identify strategies for coping with challenging behaviors in an early childhood setting and reflect on how practices, activities, and instructional methods can be used for support.
Nicol Russell and Lauren Zbyszinki
Handouts:
Since 2009 there has been a growing interest in the reduction of seclusion and restraints (S/R) in schools. Nineteen states have enacted meaningful protections while other states (including Arizona) have developed best practice recommendations. At the heart of most laws and recommendations lies adequate training and careful implementation of positive behavioral interventions and support (PBIS). This presentation is an overview of how and why PBIS can be used to prevent unnecessary and dangerous instances of S/R.
Dan Davidson, BCBA and Celeste Nameth
Handouts: PowerPoint
Much attention is being given to planning, writing, and revising long narrative, informative, and argumentative products. Perhaps even more gains in writing will flow from a focus on writing for learning: completing short writing assignments often in all classes. In this session, Dr. Archer will present procedures to scaffold writing summaries, compare-contrast paragraphs, and responses to reading (explanations, opinions, etc.) using strategies, writing frames, and think sheets.
Anita Archer
Handouts: Handout
Think out of the box and be fearless! Invite the lunch lady, the facilities guy, and the IT dude to your next IEP meeting! Here is a way to engage new, exciting people in the journey of students toward life after graduation. These champions will bring new energy to your transition program as they use their specialties to work with students! The speakers will get you started with a structure to make these work experiences with people at your site run like a charm!
Janet Holt and John Muir
Handouts: PowerPoint

11:00 – 12:00 Lunch

12:00 – 12:15 Break

12:15 – 1:25 General Session – Solana E

Assessment

1:25 – 1:40 Break

1:40 – 2:50 Breakout Sessions

The roles of educators and educational data are the current emphases as the shift towards results-driven accountability continues and the monitoring system evolves. This interactive training walks teachers through the data use framework that is part of Arizona’s revised system of general supervision.
Cathie Devers and Teresa Kirkman
Handouts:
K–12 participants will engage with discipline-specific text to help students read subject matter like historians, scientists, mathematicians, literary critics, physical education experts, and artists. The participants will take away specific strategies to help their students access discipline-specific text.
Jennifer Farrlley and Sandra Laine
Handouts: PowerPoint Handout 1, Handout 2, and Handout 3
Participants will work in small groups to identify appropriate components of the present levels of academic achievement and functional performance (PLAAFP) and develop plans that address all the needs of students. They will use the tools and resources provided to enhance their IEP writing skills.
Diana Parmenter
Handouts: PowerPoint and Handout
This presentation will give an overview of the National Center and State Collaborative (NCSC) Alternate Assessment instructional support and resources and highlight how one Arizona educator is incorporating the resources and making a difference for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
Audra Ahumada and Rebecca Franklin
Handouts: PowerPoint and Handout
Participants will be introduced to the principles of structured teaching for working with students with autism and explore the foundations of how to provide structure for students. The role of visual supports for people with autism will be emphasized.
Lee Stickle
Handouts: PowerPoint
The early childhood classroom is an ideal place to focus on children’s social and emotional development. As educators we need to understand the connection and value emotional skills play in young children’s development and learning. In this session, the presenters will explore culture and learning through research-based information and strategies. The speakers will define what is meant by the term “emotionally supporting young learners.”
Lauren Zbynski and Nicol Russell
Handouts:
Most district policies call for some form of crisis incident reporting (IR) when seclusions or restraints (S/R) are used. In fact, the Office for Civil Rights now requires these data from each school. But more than simply reporting, good IR systems can inform school personnel of common triggers, people, or locations associated with the crises so that future instances may be prevented. This presentation provides examples of how IR data can be used to prevent or reduce future instances of S/R.
Dan Davidson, BCBA and Celeste Nameth
Handouts: PowerPoint
Much attention is being given to planning, writing, and revising long narrative, informative, and argumentative products. Perhaps even more gains in writing will flow from a focus on writing for learning: completing short writing assignments often in all classes. In this session, Dr. Archer will present procedures to scaffold writing summaries, compare-contrast paragraphs, and responses to reading (explanations, opinions, etc.) using strategies, writing frames, and think sheets.
Anita Archer
Handouts: Handouts: Handout
Participants will examine the benefits of and purposes for writing in class and how writing supports mathematical understanding as well as communication among students. Attendees will also examine how effective mathematical writing integrates English Lanaguage Arts (ELA) writing standards 2, 5, and 10 in the math classroom. Teachers will leave with specific examples and purposes for writing in mathematics and how this supports Arizona’s College and Career Ready Standards.
Tracy Fazio
Handouts: PowerPoint

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