Tuesday

Tiger Border

Arizona’s Fourteenth Annual Transition Conference

Promote Strengths & Inspire Success

August 25 – 27, 2014

Talking Stick Resort

9800 East Indian Bend Road

Scottsdale, AZ 85256

(866) 877-9897

Information Schedule vendors National Presenters
Registration Monday Tuesday Wednesday

Click on the Session Title to view the session description.

+ = Session handouts are posted

Tuesday, August 26

Program at a Glance 

6:45 a.m. — 8:15 a.m. Breakfast Buffet

7:00 a.m. — 8:00 a.m. Pre-Conference Session

Grab your coffee, a side of bacon, and join representatives of the Arizona Employment First Strategic Planning Committee and Dr. Laura Owens, Executive Director of the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) National, for an open dialog about Arizona’s Employment First initiative. A brief overview of Employment First and national events affecting how states provide employment and other community services will be provided. Most importantly, however, participants will have the opportunity to become part of Arizona’s strategic planning process by sharing thoughts, ideas, and options as to how Arizona can create an environment where integrated employment is the primary consideration for all individuals with disabilities of working age. Please join this conversation in “building expectations, creating opportunities, and supporting success.”
Handouts: PowerPoint

8:15 a.m. — 9:30 a.m. Welcome and Introduction of Keynote Speakers: Letitia Labrecque, Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) Program Administrator

Opening Keynote Address—Dr. Cinda Johnson and Linea Johnson
Perfect Chaos: A Journey to Recovery +

For young people with a diagnosed and often unexpected mental illness, transitioning to life after high school becomes more complicated. Advocacy, self-determination, and ultimately, empowerment may be the essential ingredients for stability and recovery. Educators play a critical role in developing and supporting these skills. Linea Johnson and her mother Cinda Johnson, authors of Perfect Chaos, share ideas and resources from their own story that will validate, strengthen, and inspire the work that educators do every day.
Handouts: Handout

9:30 a.m. — 9:45 a.m. Break: Vendor/Exhibitor Hall Open; Artwork Viewing

9:45 a.m. — 11:00 a.m. Concurrent Sessions

Richard Villa
As students with disabilities are increasingly taught in general education classes, many schools are moving toward offering co-teaching as a service delivery option. Co-teaching involves two or more people sharing responsibility for planning, teaching, and assessing all of the students assigned to a classroom. Through presentation and viewing of DVD footage, participants will become familiar with four approaches to co-teaching. Scheduling, role clarification, administrative support, lesson planning, transition support, and other logistical issues will be explored. In addition, participants will receive tools to assist in the establishment of trust, facilitation of communication, coordination of effort, and effective planning. Many of these tools are applicable to other kinds of planning meetings, including transition planning. (This session will be repeated immediately following the break.)
Handouts: PowerPoint and Handout
Lorrie Sheehy, Jan Cawthorne, and Darleen Sithole
Does your school serve students aged 16 years or older who have an IEP? If so, beginning in June 2015, your school will now be required to participate in the PSO Survey each year, not just once every six years. This is a big change! Come hear about the change and the resources available to assist schools with this requirement. Parents, youth, and school personnel will benefit from hearing about this new requirement and learning how Everyone Counts, Everyone In will enable stakeholders at the local and state level to better understand what youth in Arizona are doing one year after leaving school and use that information to improve secondary transition programs. Co-presenters will share lessons learned and processes created as a result of their annual participation in the PSO Survey. Participants will leave the presentation with materials, resources, and tips that can be used immediately for an efficient and effective participation in Everyone Counts, Everyone In: Arizona’s PSO Survey.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Charlotte Alverson
The terms research-based practice and evidence-based practice are common in today’s education world. In this session, the presenter will define these terms and provide a list of current instructional strategies shown to be effective for improving in-school outcomes for students with disabilities.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Angela Gray, Erin Galland, Lorraine Bain, Sadie Oxtoby, Vicki Wachter, and Student Panel
For many students, the years during and after high school can be a time of adventure and excitement. For others, it can be a very confusing time. This session will introduce participants to students who are successfully navigating paths through the transition process on their way to achieving their goals. Panelists will describe how they worked with outside agencies, employers, and school staff in order to make their successful transition possible. There are many resources available to students and their families to assist them with this process, including some that will be provided to all session participants.
Handouts: PowerPoint and Handout
Mark Jacoby, Linda Tasco, Margaret Corcoran-Smith, Michael Leyva, and Laura Owens
Over the past ten years, state agency administrators and stakeholders in many states have been championing integrated employment and advocating for state-level goals and operating policies that prioritize employment as the first choice of and preferred outcome for individuals with disabilities for day services. Collectively, these actions have become known as Employment First initiatives. Under this approach, state agencies are working on changing systems to focus funding, resources, training, and daily assistance on efforts that result in increased community-based, integrated employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities. Currently, 28 states have invested in some level of Employment First activity, with Arizona closing in on becoming number 29. During this session, Dr. Laura Owens, Executive Director of the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) National, will provide an overview of the national events driving state actions. Members of the Arizona Employment First Strategic Planning Committee will discuss Arizona’s current efforts from the state agency, community provider, and family and advocacy perspectives. Session participants will also learn how they can support the initiatives agencies are undertaking to build expectations, create opportunities, and support the success of Arizonans with disabilities.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Douglas Cheney
The presenter is the co-author of the Program Evaluation and Expert Review for Programs Serving Students with EBD (PEER-EBD). The tool has been used in more than 100 classrooms over the past eight years to assess the strengths and weaknesses of classroom practices. Nineteen essential classroom practices are assessed, with each practice having from four to eight indicators. Both classroom and district staff use the PEER-EBD to assess their practice, and an expert evaluator then provides objective ratings to look at concurrence between the two school staff members’ and the evaluator’s perceptions. Results from the evaluation are used to develop actions plans for professional development activities, to determine use of resources, to enhance use of practices, and to collect useful student and classroom-level data. When used for multiple years, results suggest the action planning and professional development process improves teachers’ instruction and classroom management; job satisfaction and retention rates; and student attendance and achievement and decreases disciplinary actions. Participants in the session will learn key steps in this evaluation approach and identify ways to use the PEER-EBD process in their classrooms or school districts.
Handouts: PowerPoint and Handout
Scott Solberg
This session will examine effective ECAP implementation strategies that were derived from a national research study. The role of transition stakeholders is to successfully prepare students to transition from high school to postsecondary education and the workforce. What does research say about the personal planning process? What are the implications for schools, districts, and Arizona businesses and industries that are especially related to students with disabilities and their transition-planning process?
Handouts: PowerPoint
Pv Jantz
Whether students with disabilities are headed toward college, career, or community life, self-determination skills are essential to their integration into their new environments. This session will introduce participants to historical patterns of disability discrimination; participants will also identify and reflect on self-biases that inadvertently contribute to discrimination. Identifying impaired consciousness is a valuable skill that enables professionals to improve supports offered to young adults with disabilities. This process allows professionals to examine, identify, evaluate, and improve upon policies, services, implementation strategies, and currently known best practices to reduce ingrained biases. Identifying and reducing biases will maximize the potential for promoting strengths and inspiring success by supporting environments that foster self-determination.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Andi Asel
This interactive workshop assists participants in applying evidence-based best practices to the required components of Indicator 13, or transition plans and services found in students’ individualized education programs (IEPs). Participants attending this training should already have a basic understanding of Indicator 13 requirements. After a review of Indicator 13 components with specific best practices’ examples, ADE/ESS transition specialists will guide participants in developing a transition plan that reflects best practice and compliance with Indicator 13 requirements. (Part II will be offered immediately following the break.)
Handouts: PowerPoint

11:00 a.m. — 11:15 a.m. Break

11:15 a.m. — 12:15 p.m. Lunch and Youth Entertainment

12:15 p.m. — 12:30 p.m. Break

12:30 p.m. — 1:45 p.m. Concurrent Sessions

Jane Soukup and Lorrie Sheehy
This session is specifically designed for former and current Secondary Transition Mentoring Project (STMP) and STMP/CCRTT team participants. Attend a conference, pick up lots of materials, jot down great ideas, brainstorm with colleagues, make some big plans—then, leave the conference and get swept up in work, unable to find the time to “think through” the conference ideas you want to turn into actions. Sound familiar? Please join this processing session—a way to walk away from the transition conference with plans in hand so that you can decide what is most important for you to do (and how to do it) when you get back to your home turf. The session is for teams, individuals, or people who want to connect with folks in similar roles. The idea is to pull out all the notes, handouts, and “can’t forget this” moments from the conference, consider the needs of your stakeholders and the strengths and needs of your organization, revisit what you liked or disliked about the ideas, and rework the web of information you collected into something practical. The session is facilitated, but the majority of the work will be completed by participants. This is simply a time and means for you to lay out your steps for the 2014–15 school year. 3-2-1 Action!
Handouts: PowerPoint
Cinda Johnson
The initial symptoms and diagnoses of mental illness for young people are overwhelming, life changing, and often get in the way of typical development in preparing for life after high school. Self-determination is a key to positive post-school outcomes. Learning and practicing advocacy skills is an essential component of stability and recovery for these students. Learn more about the process from adversity to empowerment and advocacy that begins in the classroom and school and carries over into the community. Resources and organizations available to support young people who are struggling with depression, anxiety, OCD, eating disorders, mood and thought disorders, and other mental health conditions will be shared. (This is a repeat session.)
Handouts: PowerPoint
Bruce Kennedy and Harold Campbell
Assistive technology (AT) used to aid student understanding in the various levels of mAThemATics curricula comes in a variety of no/low tech, mid-tech, and high-tech tools and strategies in support of the Arizona’s College and Career Ready Standards. AT supports can include hands-on manipulatives; worksheet color coding strategies; and various devices, tools, computer software, mobile device applications, and supportive web sites. Come to this session to calculate AT support for those who may need assistance in math for activities of daily living and employment.
Handouts:
Richard Villa
As students with disabilities are increasingly taught in general education classes, many schools are moving toward offering co-teaching as a service delivery option. Co-teaching involves two or more people sharing responsibility for planning, teaching, and assessing all of the students assigned to a classroom. Through presentation and viewing of DVD footage, participants will become familiar with four approaches to co-teaching. Scheduling, role clarification, administrative support, lesson planning, transition support, and other logistical issues will be explored. In addition, participants will receive tools to assist in the establishment of trust, facilitation of communication, coordination of effort, and effective planning. Many of these tools are applicable to other kinds of planning meetings, including transition planning. (This is a repeat session.)
Handouts: PowerPoint and Handout
Janice Biezad, Pamela Swart, and Student Panel
Apache Junction High School offers both on- and off-campus work experiences for students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities as part of its life skills transition program. The backbone of the program is Mrs. Swart’s “Snack Shack.” The business was started in 2010 and has expanded several times to become a true project-based learning model. With a small amount of funding available from the district to purchase a Kuerig coffee maker, supplies, and muffins, the business began with students in the class selling coffee break snacks to school staff and now has grown to include a rather lucrative lunch business as well. The students who work at the business fill out applications, interview, and are “hired” by the transition team. Students are paid every two weeks from Snack Shack earnings and learn how to manage their money. The program is overseen by Mrs. Swart and another staff member, along with general education students who act as tutors for some of the class members. Come to this session to hear about this fantastic work experience program, as well as other transition program activities available to Mrs. Swart’s students.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Linda Tasco and Panel
This session features a panel of young adults who said, “I can be strong and I can be successful” and who, with a bit of support from others who believed in them, went ahead and showed us that of course they could! All the individuals did what it took to find a job in their community and are anxious to tell others what they do and what it means to them. By way of introduction to their stories, participants will also receive an overview of the Arizona Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), including eligibility criteria and the services and supports provided through its network of service providers. Presenters will highlight the specific employment supports and services a student could be eligible for both during and after transitioning from high school. Opportunity for audience questions will be provided.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Rita Aitken and Shelly Persons
As an increasing number of youth/young adults with chronic health conditions are attending school, it is crucial that schools address the needs of these students so that they can achieve optimal learning. Chronic health conditions seen in schools include but are not limited to asthma, life-threatening allergies, seizures, orthopedic conditions, mental health disorders, and diabetes. Students who require health care services during the school day can utilize an individual health care plan. This plan may also be used in place of or in conjunction with other health or education-related plans such as a 504 plan, an individualized education program (IEP), or a medical authorization. In this session, youth/young adults and their families will receive practical tips on developing an effective plan in collaboration with the student, family, and staff. In small groups, participants will have an opportunity to practice what they have learned by creating a health care plan and participate in a focused, follow-up group discussion. Participants will also receive an overview of the Health Home Organizer, a tool to assist youth/young adults and their families in accessing needed services. Youth/young adults and their families who participate in this session will be provided with an organizer for their personal use.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Mary Boegemann and Sara Sembiante
“Self-determination is a mix of skills you will use throughout your life which include your personal beliefs and values and skills that empower you to make choices and take control of your life according to your own interests, needs, and abilities.” (Evers, 2013). All students deserve the right to make as many of their own decisions as possible. This session offers participants suggestions, recommendations, and resources that can help youth recognize the need for self-advocacy skills in their everyday routines and includes strategies to incorporate and increase these self-determination skills. Disability awareness, informed choice, disclosure, and problem solving are important concepts that should be introduced to students when they are in high school to promote self-determination. The presenters will identify opportunities for youth to advocate for personal and disability-related needs as they transition into adulthood. Participants will explore resources/activities to incorporate in IEPs and in vocational planning for youth. Participants will also discover strategies to assist in developing a time-line for enhancing self-determination skills. Join the journey of self-determination!
Handouts: PowerPoint, Handout 1, Handout 2, Handout 3, Handout 4, Handout 5, Handout 6, Handout 7, Handout 8, Handout 9, and Handout 10
Janna Murrell and Leslie Williams
There are many legal options for families to consider when their child turns 18 and gains all the rights and responsibilities of adulthood. Learn what the options are, including: power of attorney, delegation of educational rights, and guardianship issues.
Handouts: PowerPoint, Handout 1, Handout 2, and Handout 3
Andi Asel
This session is Part II of Writing a Secondary IEP for Transition Using Best Practices Workshop. This interactive workshop assists participants in applying evidence-based best practices to the required components of Indicator 13, or transition plans and services found in students’ individualized education programs (IEPs). Participants attending this training should already have a basic understanding of Indicator 13 requirements. After a review of Indicator 13 components with specific best practices’ examples, ADE/ESS transition specialists will guide participants in developing a transition plan that reflects best practice and compliance with Indicator 13 requirements.
Handouts: PowerPoint

1:45 p.m. — 2:15 p.m. Vendor/Exhibitor Break

Participants can take advantage of this extended break to visit the Vendor and Exhibitor Hall to network, learn about community and agency supports, and consider transition-related purchases.

2:15 p.m. — 3:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions

Charlotte Alverson and Lorrie Sheehy
Attend a conference, pick up lots of materials, jot down great ideas, brainstorm with colleagues, make some big plans—then, leave the conference and get swept up in work unable to find the time to “think through” the conference ideas you want to turn into actions. Sound familiar? Please join this processing session—a way to walk away from the transition conference with plans in hand so that you can decide what is most important for you to do (and how to do it) when you get back to your home turf. The session is for teams, individuals, or people who want to connect with folks in similar roles. The idea is to pull out all the notes, handouts, and “can’t forget this” moments from the conference, consider the needs of your stakeholders and the strengths and needs of your organization, revisit what you liked or disliked about the ideas, and rework the web of information you collected into something practical. The session is facilitated, but the majority of the work will be completed by participants. This is simply a time and means for you to lay out your steps for the 2014–15 school year. 3-2-1 Action!
Handouts: PowerPoint
Tricia Bawn
Navigating through the transition from high school to higher education as a student with a disability can be a confusing and stressful process. There are distinct differences between accommodations provided in high school and those offered in higher education. This interactive presentation will include a comparison of those differences and offer insights into the types of supports available in higher education. Discussion will also include acceptable documentation, types of accommodations, delivery of accommodations, as well as criteria and methods used to request accommodations. Tips for navigating disability resources in higher education, planning for higher education, and student self-advocacy will also be discussed.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Amy Gaumer Erickson
Transition assessment is a cornerstone of effective transition planning. Following the tiered approach of RTI and PBIS, transition assessment can be implemented within the curriculum for all students, to groups of students based on specific interests and needs, and individually to students that require unique approaches or further assessment. Examples of both formal and informal assessment techniques will be presented, as well as a case study showing how transition assessment led to quality adult outcomes for one student. Additionally, each participant will be provided with a template for developing a Schoolwide Transition Assessment Framework.
Handouts: PowerPoint, Handout 1, and Handout 2
Gail Jacobs, Sue Aguilera, Olga Ruiz, and Jose Rosario
This presentation will take participants on a journey to see a secure care school’s transformation into a student-centered transition school that encourages collaboration and high expectations for staff and students alike. The session will include teacher and student voices on the effectiveness of this transformation from teacher-led classrooms to student self-motivated and cooperative learning teams. The program is based on juvenile justice research on best practices for transitioning students from secure care using their strengths, career exploration, social skills, and postsecondary educational goals to create self-determination in these youth. Educators and secure care staff will learn how this interactive, flexible, student-centered transition program will create a positive atmosphere in the classroom, with students self-monitoring their behavior to create a community of learners.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Kay Schreiber and John Balentine
What are the skills students need to get a job, keep a job, and advance in a career? Do your students have these skills? Getting students to graduate is important, but helping them become employable and ready for the workforce is another task in and of itself. Arizona’s Workplace Employability Skills, defined by the voices of Arizona business and industry, identify the standards for the future of Arizona’s workplace. Come join us as we explore the skills and resources needed for students to become and remain employable in the 21st century.
Handouts: PowerPoint, Handout 1, Handout 2, Handout 3, Handout 4, Handout 5, and Handout 6
Douglas Cheney
Transition of youth with EBD is a challenge, and their graduation, enrollment in college, and employment rates continue to be a national concern. Additionally, 25% of parents of youth with EBD say they were dissatisfied with high school services provided and report that transition planning for their children was not very useful. Yet, the essential elements of effective transition planning and delivery have been identified and when applied effectively, have shown improved educational, vocational, and community outcomes for youth with EBD. These elements include: (1) self-determination, (2) appropriate assessment, (3) personal future’s planning, (4) individualized education programs carefully linked with transition plans, (5) naturally supported, successful academic, vocational, and community placements, (6) cultural considerations, and (7) parent/family involvement when possible. These elements have recently received much attention in published literature and practice and will be discussed in this session.
Handouts: PowerPoint, Handout 1, and Handout 2
Clayton Guffey and Jill Pleasant
Assistive technology (AT) offers students with disabilities the opportunity to succeed at tasks that are difficult or even impossible to accomplish without that technology. School districts have an obligation to obtain the AT that a student needs when the need has been documented in the student’s IEP. But that obligation ends at graduation, even though the need for the technology will continue beyond receipt of a high school diploma. Who will pay for or provide the technology the young adult needs to successfully transition to postsecondary education, a career, or community living? Often there can be a “pot of gold” for funding AT after graduation. However, finding it can require a serious search for resources that match the student’s specific circumstances. This session is designed to inform students and their families (although transition specialists and teachers are also welcome) about the AT funding streams that may be available to them and to understand the roles, responsibilities, and limitations in funding that come from federal, state, public, and private sources including the requirements and lack of requirements that postsecondary institutions and employers have concerning assistive technology. Participants will leave the session with a matrix of potential funding resources.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Heather Griller Clark, Darlene Thompson, and Chris Whaley
Video games have become a powerful tool in education because they are engaging, motivating, and relevant for many students, including those with disabilities. Games are perfect for transition planning as they allow students to figure out “who they are” by trying on different roles in the workplace and the community. They also allow students to solve problems, make decisions, and explore the consequences of these decisions in nonthreatening environments. Gameplay of this nature can have a significantly positive impact on self-efficacy and promote transition success. In this interactive session, a new online game, based on concepts within the Merging Two Worlds transition curriculum, will be revealed. As the game is played, game developers will demonstrate how it can: (1) increase self-awareness, (2) promote problem solving and positive decision making, (3) promote social connections and communities of learning, and (4) develop intrinsic motivation and feelings of success for students.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Hilary Mahoney
In this interactive and thought-provoking workshop, participants will learn how to support transitioning youth through collaboration with the behavioral health system. In many cases, the education system and the behavioral health system share the same goals and work with the same youth. However, the two systems continue to work in silos. This workshop will provide real-world examples of how the education and behavioral health systems can work together to promote successful transitions to adulthood through the promotion of daily living skills, employment, and other meaningful experiences. Participants will learn how to use the child family team (CFT) and adult recovery team (ART) processes to gather resources and utilize natural supports. The session will include an overview of the behavioral health system in Arizona and covered behavioral health services. Participants will walk away with renewed enthusiasm and resources to help the youth in their schools and communities.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Haley Thoman and Tim Stump
What happens when an enthusiastic employer coordinator, employers who want to provide opportunities to students with disabilities, schools that want to help their graduating seniors gain employment, and a few zealous vocational rehabilitation counselors get together? An Employment Encounter happens! These parties have formed a planning team to collaborate on planning seven events around Arizona. The events were not just ordinary job fairs, but they also provided short, engaging sessions from the employers about important job-seeking skills such as impressive interviewing, remarkable résumé writing, and befitting behaviors to keep a job. The presenters will discuss student reaction to these events, successful employment stories, how they engaged with school districts and employers, and how school staff might create their own “Employment Encounter.” This session is a perfect accompaniment to the session entitled “Inside information: The Employer’s Perspective.”
Handouts: PowerPoint
Patricia Cummins and Rebecca Franklin
Hey sleepy heads, would you like to start your school day with a nice hot cup of coffee, tea, or hot chocolate? How about a fresh brewed iced tea or iced coffee, accompanied by a snack delivered directly to your classroom by students from the KLaSSic Kafe? The presenters will share their experiences starting and operating a coffee shop within their rural high school to give students with mild to severe disabilities the opportunity to learn and use business skills. This workshop will include start up information, practical operating information, and lesson plan extensions tied into Arizona’s College and Career Ready Standards, including common core connectors for math, reading, and writing and work samples and photos.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Gary Greene
This session will review research on the transition of CLD youth with disabilities. Evidence-based practices for how to engage in effective transition planning with CLD families, using the principles of cultural reciprocity, will be discussed. Much of the content of this presentation comes from a recently published book written by the presenter on the subject of transition planning for CLD youth with disabilities.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Laura Owens
Integrated employment is an expectation, NOT a choice, for individuals with disabilities of working age. This session will provide participants with an overview of the challenges faced by service systems that are based primarily on a medical model, as opposed to a person-centered approach. The presenter will discuss how some states are beginning to experience “service system evolution” through Employment First and other initiatives. As Socrates said, “The secret to change is to focus all your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.” Educators, policy makers, service providers, state agencies, families, and self-advocates cannot be in the position of waiting for the world to change. Each has a role to play in creating the desired change. Participants should join this session to learn how they might become part of Arizona’s systems change in support of employment for persons with disabilities.
Handouts: PowerPoint

3:30 p.m. — 3:45 p.m. Break

3:45 p.m.— 5:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions

Gary Greene
This session explores various theoretical explanations of why children experience failure in school and potential placement in special education. The notion of “dyspedagogy” is discussed, followed by a presentation of various evidence-based, research-validated instructional practices that help all children learn and allow teachers to teach “the unteachable.”
Handouts: PowerPoint and Handout
Sang Hee Kim, Dara Johnson, Nicholas Love, Laura Schweers, Brandi Robertson, and Michelle Frias
How are youth best supported when transitioning into the workforce? The ASPIRE Project is a five-year scientific study funded by the US Department of Education (the PROMISE Initiative) that will recruit and enroll over 1,000 youth with mild to severe disabilities, ages 14–16, who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Those assigned to the experimental group will benefit from a coordinated set of interventions with the goals of improving education and employment outcomes for the youth and strengthening their families. This session will provide an overview of the project and implementation plan for the state of Arizona. Presenters will include youth, ASPIRE staff, and a panel that includes collaborating state agencies. Six western states, Arizona, Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Utah, comprise the ASPIRE consortium. The PROMISE Initiative (Promoting Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income) is a joint initiative of the US Department of Education, the US Social Security Administration, the US Department of Health and Human Services, and the US Department of Labor.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Simon Crawford and Garret Westlake
Students with disabilities face a number of challenges in successfully navigating the transition to postsecondary education. Colleges and universities offer a plethora of choices and offerings when it comes to support services. These on-campus offerings are in addition to off-campus support programs that provide services and supports. In this session, participants will receive a needs assessment tool to help students identify their individual needs and understand how their needs match with the supports and resources available on-campus and off-campus. Case study examples will be used to highlight appropriateness of fit between student needs and resources.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Lorrie Sheehy
Does your school serve students aged 16 years or older who have an IEP? If so, beginning in June 2015, your school will now be required to participate in the PSO Survey each year, not just once every six years. This is a big change! Come hear about the change and the resources available to assist schools with this requirement. Parents, youth, and school personnel will benefit from hearing about this new requirement and learning how Everyone Counts, Everyone In will enable stakeholders at the local and state level to better understand what youth in Arizona are doing one year after leaving school and use that information to improve secondary transition programs. Participants will leave the presentation with materials, resources, and tips that can be used immediately for an efficient and effective participation in Everyone Counts, Everyone In: Arizona’s PSO Survey.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Curtis Richards
The diverse needs of youth cannot be met by any one family, school, or program. The successful transition of all youth to adulthood demands coordination and collaboration across the systems, agencies, and individuals who interact with each youth. Families must have support to help their son or daughter make the right choices at the right times based on the right information. The Family Guideposts help families navigate the complicated world of transition. In this session, families, youth, and youth transition professionals will learn about the five areas of transition in the Guideposts for Success, key outcomes for youth related to family engagement, how to support youth with respect to their needs within each Guidepost area, and strategies and resources families can use to create an effective transition plan for their youth and advocate for it.
Handouts: PowerPoint, Handout 1, Handout 2, Handout 3, Handout 4, and Handout 5
Phyllis Brodsky and Dan Perino
Higher education is no longer unobtainable for students with intellectual disabilities (ID). Since 2010, 27 colleges and universities in the United States have been designing and developing postsecondary opportunities for students with mild, moderate, and severe intellectual disabilities through a model demonstration grant from the Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID). More than ever before, K–12 instruction needs to prepare all students, including those with significant disabilities, for the possibility of college. This session will offer strategies and suggestions for college readiness for students who have intellectual disabilities emerging from any school setting. A strong emphasis will be placed on social, academic, and technology skills with a connection to Arizona’s academic standards beginning in kindergarten. Real-life examples will be provided that link academic accountability and personal responsibility to success in college and ultimately, in work and in life.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Amy Gaumer Erickson
In this presentation, participants will learn how other educators have created connections between the college and career ready standards and career/life skills instruction through reviewing over 50 teacher-developed lesson examples. These lesson ideas directly align with specific language arts and mathematics standards, while also addressing transition skills. Participants will leave with concrete lesson examples and resources for sharing the information.
Handouts: PowerPoint and Handout
Robert Foley and Stacey Shirra
Using data from the National Post School Outcomes Center (University of Oregon), this presentation will look at key predictors of success for individuals with disabilities based on common interventions used across the United States. Key concepts such as the role of backward chaining and forward chaining will be explained and reinforced as critical components of determining employment outcomes, along with the use of peer-assisted instruction models with embedded simulation components. A major point of emphasis within the presentation will be sharing practical ways to implement transition programming that encompasses these predictors. Specific details will be shared about successful programs that are used within Mesa Public Schools such as Dual Enrollment/AAA115 Strategies for College Success, internship placements, work experience, and targeted on-campus career and technical educational opportunities, such as screen printing.
Handouts: Handout 1, Handout 2, and Handout 3
Hailey Thoman and Tim Stump
Get inside the minds of employment experts with this panel of representatives from Arizona businesses. These employers will talk about how students can increase their job-seeking success and answer such questions as: (1) What types of positions are available at the business? (2) What is the workplace environment like at the business and why is this information important to a job-seeker? (3) What interview behaviors will help an individual get a job and what behaviors will result in losing the job? (4) What employee characteristics are most important to an employer? and (5) What are some examples of accommodations offered to employees in the past?
Wendy Barrie, Shanna Unger, and Izrahias Morales
This session will be presented by the Director of Special Services in the Tolleson Union High School District and a special education teacher from the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office, Lower Buckeye Jail. Presenters will discuss an individual case study in which collaboration between the two educational agencies, service agencies, and the student and parent resulted in a thoughtful, student-centered transition plan that allowed a student exiting from secure care to reintegrate into his home school district with the necessary supports in place prior to his release date. The work that was completed in the months prior to the release, including what is required to have a transition meeting within the jail environment, will be discussed. The presentation will outline strategies to ensure that the student’s social-emotional and academic needs were considered and proactively planned for during the process. In addition, the steps used in assisting the student to be actively engaged in the planning and self-advocacy in his transition meeting with his team will be reviewed.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Nancy Boyle and Cheryl Wilson
The mission of Easter Seals Blake Foundation, Sage Division, is to enable each individual served to meet his or her maximum potential for independent, productive living and developmental growth. Sage’s guiding principles are that every person has the right to assume a role as a participating and accepted member of his/her community and that employment is a means to becoming involved with one’s community and to acquiring a status role and self-sufficiency. With limited employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, especially in rural communities, Sage has developed innovative and creative businesses to generate supportive and inclusive employment for individuals with disabilities throughout southern Arizona. This presentation will describe the innovative planning, creation, implementation, and continued funding of one of the most successful community businesses in a rural area: Main Street Internet Cafe in Safford, Arizona. Participants will see that the Cafe provides community employment at competitive wages and provides on-the-job supports based on individual needs. The presenters will also discuss the importance of anticipating and matching community needs to business creation and the role of community partners in the development of a new business.
Handouts: PowerPoint, Handout 1, and Handout 2
Laura Owens
Transition and Employment First go together like the proverbial peas and carrots. Employment First establishes the expectation that employment in the general workforce should be the primary postsecondary outcome and the preferred option for young adults with disabilities after high school. Arizona is joining the other 28 states involved in establishing Employment First policy and practice to promote integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities of working age. One focus of many Employment First initiatives is the role of educators and the use of transition practices that support employment outcomes for students with disabilities. The presentation will focus on assessment, discovery strategies, and job development practices that will enhance employment opportunities for youth with significant disabilities. Participants will learn how they can help identify individual preferences, negotiate and educate the business community, and develop higher expectations for the independence and community integration of students and young adults with significant disabilities.
Handouts: PowerPoint
Kay Schreiber and William McQueary
In this session, the presenters will discuss Arizona student plans for success, special education transition planning, and high school Education Career Action Plans (ECAPs). The requirements for transition plans established by IDEA will be reviewed and a crosswalk for comparing these plans with the four ECAP attributes required by the Arizona State Board Rule will be provided. Additionally, the presenters will describe how participants can assist students in identifying their high school and postsecondary options using the Arizona Career Information System (AzCIS). (This session will be repeated on Wednesday.)
Handouts: PowerPoint, Handout 1, Handout 2, and Handout 2

5:00 p.m. — 6:30 p.m. Reception and Raffle Drawing

 

 

 


Promote Strengths

Sponsored by:

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Arizona Department of Education,
Exceptional Student Services
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Arizona Department of Economic Security,
Rehabilitation Services Administration,
Vocational Rehabilitation
Arizona Department of Economic Security,
Division of Developmental Disabilities
Arizona Department of Health Services,
Office for Children with Special Health Care Needs