Tuesday

Arizona’s Thirteenth Annual Transition Conference

“I”s Focused on the Future: Invested, Involved, and Independent

September 30—October 2, 2013

Talking Stick Resort

9800 East Indian Bend Road

Scottsdale, AZ 85256

(866) 877-9897


Click on the Session Title to view the session description.

+ = Session handouts are posted

N = Recommended for professional participants who are new to the area of secondary transition


Tuesday, October 1

Tuesday Program at a Glance

6:45 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.  Breakfast Buffet

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.  RSA/VR Transition Early Bird Session Session (Quail E & F)

Ana Núñez and RSA/VR Transition TeamThis session is intended for staff from high school districts statewide that partner or would like to partner with the Rehabilitation Services Administration, Vocational Rehabilitation (RSA/VR) Program (with or without a formal contract), and that provide transition services to high school students. RSA/VR personnel that service these school districts are also encouraged to attend. Input from participants will guide the discussion, but topics relevant to the needs of both partners will also be explored. The entire RSA/VR Transition team will be available to address the audience regarding programmatic and contractual aspects. Information will be provided for the following areas: eligibility, functional limitations, transportation, and referrals. Other topics will be covered as time permits.

8:15 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Concurrent Sessions

Lorrie Sheehy, Jan Cawthorne, Darleen Sithole, and Charlotte AlversonData obtained from the Post School Outcomes (PSO) Survey at both the state and local level is a valuable tool when used in conjunction with research-based predictors of post-school success. This interactive session will discuss results of the 2012 PSO Survey, drilling down through the data to obtain results for subgroups, including category of disability, ethnicity, gender, and method of exit. A school panel will discuss how local PSO results are being used in districts to improve the transition planning process and services provided. Predictors of post-school success will also be highlighted. Handout: PowerPoint

Jason Carpenter and Stephen WalkerResearch has shown that the more people (youth included) feel that they have “a voice” in what they do, the greater their confidence level is and the higher their success level will be. The process for youth to find and express their voice effectively can be long and challenging, and once a youth’s voice is “found,” the challenge remains to help others honor and respect that voice. This session will include excerpts from a training developed by NARBHA (Northern Arizona Regional Behavioral Health Authority) and MIKID (Mentally Ill Kids in Distress) to help behavioral health providers better support youth and their clinical team members in fostering and honoring youth voice. Using the Department of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) Youth Involvement in Arizona’s Behavioral Health System practice protocol as a guide, the presenters will describe a training that incorporates real-life scenarios into video-shorts; this training demonstrates how professionals can develop youth voice through three phases: advocating for their voice, partnering in developing their voice, and assuring others are honoring their voice. The session will be co-presented by a young adult who found his voice and has made it heard across northern Arizona. Participants can expect to leave this training with inspiration, strategies, and resources on developing youth voice in any setting. Handout: PowerPoint

James MartinTransition assessments provide information to help determine transition interests, strengths, and needs to build the present level section of the IEP and to enable the IEP team to determine postsecondary and annual goals. Special education rules mandate the use of transition assessments, but the “what” and “how” are left up to educators to figure out. Educators, parents, and students need a transition assessment framework that provides practical guidance on what to do and when to do it. This session will present a framework to conceptualize the transition assessment process and a set of questions that educators, family members, and students need to answer to determine postsecondary and annual goals. A new transition assessment will be introduced to demonstrate how this framework can be used. Included, too, will be a listing of the most popular transition assessments educators report using across the country today. Handout: PowerPoint and Fact Sheet

Bruce KennedyEducation and rehabilitation professionals are likely working with individuals who can’t read grade-level text or employment materials independently—and it is commonly known that devices such as computers, tablets, iPads, MP3 players, and other items can allow folks to listen to the text. But how do you choose a device? How are books loaded “in there”? Technology devices, software, apps, and digital files are changing rapidly. Come to this demonstration session and learn the basics about getting accessible reading materials into the hands of students and clients who have print disabilities. Handout: PowerPoint (Part II of this session will be offered immediately following the break.)

Curtis RichardsAs youth transition from high school to postsecondary or work settings, they go from a world where they are entitled to the accommodations laid out in their IEPs to places where they are eligible for what they actively request. Youth must know what to ask for, when to ask for it, and whom to ask in each setting. The goal of this workshop is to share strategies for supporting youth as they make the personal decisions about when, where, how, and with whom to share their disability in school, work, and social settings. This will be an interactive session in which participants will get hands-on experience with the youth workbook as well as the companion guide for adults and the new cyber-disclosure addendum. Each participant will receive practical strategies, a free copy of the workbook for youth, a companion guide to disclosure for caring adults, and the new “cyber-disclosure” addendum. Participants will learn best practices for helping youth to (1) understand their disability better and how to talk about it; (2) understand their rights and responsibilities under the law; (3) decide whether to disclose their disability; and (4) understand how disclosing their disability can improve educational, employment, and social opportunities. Handout: PowerPoint

Stephan Hamlin-SmithOne of the keys to effective transition from secondary to postsecondary education (PSE) is preparation. . . . Some might say it’s the most important key.  Self-advocacy and determination, academics, soft skills, finances, documentation, PSE selection, changing parental roles, changing rights and responsibilities—there is so much to prepare for and often too little time to prepare.  Come join (and add to) this rich discussion from an “insider’s” point of view.

Paul WehmanFor most youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), employment upon graduation from high school or college is elusive. Employment rates are reported in many studies to be very low despite many years of intensive special education services. This presentation will show the preliminary results of a randomized clinical trial of Project SEARCH plus ASD supports on the employment outcomes for youth with ASD between the ages of 18 and 21. Handout: PowerPoint

Alissa Trollinger, William McQueary, and Vicky RozichGraduation for students with disabilities is a hot topic in Arizona and throughout the nation. This session will provide an overview of two newly developed guidance documents related to graduation for students with disabilities. These documents are intended to clarify Arizona’s graduation requirements, indicate their interplay with the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and consider how graduation requirements impact students with disabilities. The presenters will also describe how timely and open communication with youth and families can meaningfully impact the graduation process. Handout: PowerPoint

David DomeniciThis presentation will discuss strategies to help keep fewer kids from heading toward the juvenile justice system, to do all that can be done to provide those who end up in the system with the best education possible while they are incarcerated, and to help them transition successfully back to high school or postsecondary school when they are released. Handouts: PowerPoint Principal Version and PowerPoint Teacher Version (This session will be repeated immediately following the break.)

Catherine FowlerThis session will provide participants with an overview of evidence-based practices and research-based predictors of improved post-school outcomes for students with disabilities in the context of implementing the Common Core State Standards in Arizona. What’s the connection? Participate and consider ways that skills associated with successful transition may be included within standards-based instruction for all students. Handout: PowerPoint (This session will be repeated immediately following the break.)

Kay SchreiberIs your school preparing your students to be “Career and College Ready”?  How does personalizing education prepare Arizona students? This session will briefly discuss the Arizona Education Career Action Plan (ECAP) process requirement for high school graduation and the special education transition plans that guide students into post–high school options and the world of work. Additionally, the presenter will spend time reviewing the Arizona Career Information System (AzCIS) online education and career planning tool, including some new enhancements and modules. This session will discuss how schools can use the system for meeting students’ needs. Participants should bring thoughts, ideas, and questions. (This session will be repeated on Wednesday morning.)

YES I CAN! (N) +

Jon Apache, Christopher Elkins, Todd Litchfield II, and Linda TascoThis session features a panel of individuals who said “YES, I CAN” to becoming employed and are anxious to tell others what it means to them. By way of introduction to the individuals’ stories, participants will also receive an overview of the Arizona Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), which includes eligibility criteria and the services and supports provided through its network of service providers. Presenters will highlight the specific employment supports and services a student could be eligible for both during and after transitioning from high school. Opportunity for audience questions will be provided. Handout: PowerPoint

9:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.  Concurrent Sessions

Charlotte Alverson, Jan Cawthorne, Darleen Sithole, and Lorrie SheehyState post-school outcomes (PSO) data will be shared in this session, along with a short description of a process for examining district- and charter-level data. The session will conclude with strategies for teachers, parents, administrators, and service providers to use to contribute to positive post-school outcomes for youth with disabilities. Handout: PowerPoint

Bruce KennedyThis session is Part II of DEAR: Download Everything and Read (Updated). Today’s young learners, transitioning students, and employees can have the information they need for success in the classroom and on the job at their fingertips. Mobile devices can access digital files, provide text to speech output on the Internet, contain reading materials, and even perform math and measurement calculations. iPads, iPods, Smartphones, Nooks, Kindles, tablets, and MP3 players can all play a role in supporting an individual with a print disability at home, at work, at school, and on the go! Participants will learn which device features may help them, their students, or their clients. Come to learn about some of the latest applications to support people with a print disability during this demonstration session. Handout: PowerPoint

Curtis RichardsThe diverse needs of youth cannot be met by any one family, school, or program. The successful transition of all youth to adulthood demands coordination and collaboration across the systems, agencies, and individuals who interact with each youth. Families must have support to help their son or daughter make the right choices at the right times based on the right information. The Family Guideposts help families navigate the complicated world of transition. In this session, families, youth, and youth transition professionals will learn about the five areas of transition in the Guideposts for Success, including key outcomes for youth related to family engagement, how to support youth with respect to their needs within each Guidepost area, and strategies and resources families can use to create an effective transition plan for their youth and then to advocate for it. Handout: PowerPoint

David DomeniciThis presentation will discuss strategies to help keep fewer kids from heading toward the juvenile justice system, to do all that can be done to provide those who end up in the system with the best education possible while they are incarcerated, and to help them transition successfully back to high school or postsecondary school when they are released. Handout: PowerPoint Principal Version and PowerPoint Teacher Version (This is a repeat session.)

Catherine FowlerThis session will provide participants with an overview of evidence-based practices and research-based predictors of improved post-school outcomes for students with disabilities in the context of implementing the Common Core State Standards in Arizona. What’s the connection? Participate and consider ways that skills associated with successful transition may be included within standards-based instruction for all students. Handout: PowerPoint (This is a repeat session.)

Stephan Hamlin-SmithThere is a distinct point-in-time when students who have chosen to pursue postsecondary education as their “next step” after public education find themselves in an educational world that—for all intents and purposes—bears no resemblance to any one they’ve known before. The engineering and construction of the bridge that joins the old and new worlds to facilitate that next step requires an inordinate number of supports, groups, and organizations working in concert—hopefully, using the student’s wishes as the guide.  Join the presenter to explore this “bridge” and the role guidance plays in effective collaboration.

Terry Montano and Sandra CancholaThe students of today are the future leaders of tomorrow. Through interactive role-play activities, participants will learn strategies to assist today’s young adults to achieve academic and social success. This session will provide a general overview of ways to increase self-advocacy, life, communication, and social skills. Information on career selection and development will be explored, and participants will see how technology and universal design programs can assist with the new College and Career Readiness Standards. A packet containing suggestions that may be used by anyone involved in the education field will be provided, and in addition, participants will be exposed to the connections between the curriculum and Arizona’s Common Core Standards. Finally, the session will offer tools demonstrating how to generate energy and enthusiasm by using effective peer mentoring. Handout: PowerPoint

Jane SoukupDuring this highly interactive session, participants will engage in learning activities such as the transition MAZE, transition assessment BINGO, a round-robin IEP audit, self-determination role play, and a summary of performance concept map. These activities can also be taken back to public schools and used immediately for staff training. This is a great session for school personnel or anyone else (including families and students) who are interested in understanding the basics of transition services. Handout: Transition Let’s Learn The Basics and Summary of Performance

William McQueary and Kay SchreiberIn this session, the presenters will discuss Arizona student plans for success—special education transition planning and high school Education Career and Action Plans (ECAPs). The requirements for transition plans established by IDEA will be reviewed and a crosswalk for comparing these plans with the four ECAP attributes required by Arizona State Board Rule will be provided. The presenters will describe how participants can assist students in identifying their high school and postsecondary options using the Arizona Career Information System (AzCIS). The team will also introduce a new tool called the Universal Encouragement Program (UEP) to collect data that helps to improve student success. Handouts: PowerPoint and Sample ECAP

11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.  Lunch

12:45 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.  Concurrent Sessions

Catherine FowlerAttend a conference, pick up lots of materials, jot down great ideas, brainstorm with colleagues, make some big plans—then, leave the conference and get swept up in work  unable to find the time to “think through” the conference ideas you want to turn into actions. Sound familiar? Please join this processing session—a way to walk away from the transition conference with plans in hand so that you can decide what is most important for you to do (and how to do it) when you get back to your home turf. The session is for teams, individuals, or people who want to connect with folks in similar roles. The idea is to pull out all the notes, handouts, and “can’t forget this” moments from the conference, consider the needs of your stakeholders and the strengths and needs of your organization, revisit what you liked or disliked about the ideas, and rework the web of information you collected into something practical. The session is facilitated but the majority of the work will be completed by participants. Drinks and snacks will be provided. This is simply a time and means for you to lay out your steps for the 2013–14 school year. 3-2-1 Action!

Tim Stump and Sara SembianteWhat happens when you get an enthusiastic employer coordinator, employers who want to provide opportunities to students with disabilities, schools that want to help their graduating seniors gain employment, and a couple of zealous vocational rehabilitation counselors? An Employment Encounter! Interested stakeholders in Maricopa County formed a planning team to collaborate on planning events in the west and east valleys. The events were not just ordinary job fairs, but they also provided short, engaging, sessions from the employers about important job-seeking skills such as impressive interviewing, remarkable résumé writing, and befitting behaviors to keep a job. The presenter will discuss student reaction to these events, successful employment stories, how engagement occurred with school districts and employers, and how other areas of the state might create their own “Employment Encounter.” This session is a perfect accompaniment to the later session entitled Inside Information: The Employer’s Perspective. Handout: PowerPoint

Loujeania BostThere is widespread consensus that family engagement is a critical ingredient for children’s school success “from cradle to career.” Research suggests that family engagement promotes a range of benefits for students, including improved school readiness, higher student achievement, better social skills and behavior, and increased likelihood of high school graduation. Even though it is clear that family engagement matters, less well understood is the role of school districts in promoting this engagement. This presentation examines how school districts build systemic family engagement from cradle to career as a core education reform strategy to ensure that parents, educators, and administrators share responsibility for family engagement. Handout: PowerPoint

Paul WehmanThis presentation examines data from the second National Longitudinal Transition Study (NLTS-2) to determine variables associated with post–high school (HS) competitive employment and to develop a logistic regression model for predicting successful employment outcomes. Many of the variables that were found to be associated with post-HS employment have been found in prior research, including family income and education, graduation, attendance at post-secondary education or training, engagement in extra-curricular and community activities, and measures of abilities such as communication and self-help skills. The strongest predictors were HS employment experiences and parental expectations of a post-HS job. Implications for schools and future research will be discussed. Handout: PowerPoint

Paul Johnson, William McQueary, Mahogany Cherry, and Gena GarlandHow do secure care educators help students plan for their best possible future?  This session will provide a brief overview of the transition process, as well as best practices to help students and teachers plan for more successful student futures. The focus will be on the outcomes for employment, education/training, and independent living, along with resources to provide support. Sealed court records will also be addressed. Handout: PowerPoint

Shelby and Tom Nurse
This workshop highlights the importance of collaborative and coordinated transition and resource planning based on students’ and families’ vision of the future. The National Assistive Technology Advocacy Project’s recently published work, AT & Transition-Aged Youth, highlights the importance of long-term advocacy and skill acquisition, while also systematically being able to connect to systems that can help support and improve post-school outcomes. This outstanding resource will be highlighted and shared with attendees. Handout: PowerPoint

Amy Gaumer EriksonLearn how to infuse transition education schoolwide while addressing Arizona’s Common Core Standards with more than 50 lesson examples illustrating how language arts and mathematics standards can address transition and college and career readiness for all students. Handout: PowerPoint (This session will be repeated immediately following the break and again later this afternoon.)

CJ Betancourt, Linda Proctor Downing, and Service Dog TeamsThis workshop provides an overview of the role of educators in identifying students who will benefit from the assistance of service dogs, as well as the challenges in transitioning these teams into the community. Educators will gain an understanding of the legal definition of service dogs vs. “emotional support” or therapy dogs and the types of tasks that these dogs may perform to increase independence for students. This interactive session will provide live demonstrations of service dog teams and tasks and use case scenarios to help participants gain an understanding of the key challenges that teams face in the community. Information and practical information will be provided to help educators assist students in understanding and anticipating these challenges and in responding in a way that will increase their chances for independence and success. Handout: PowerPoint

William KellibrewTraumatic experiences can be dehumanizing, shocking, or terrifying, singularly or multiply compounding over time, and often include betrayal of a trusted person or institution and a loss of safety. Trauma impacts one’s spirituality and relationships with self, others, communities, and environment, often resulting in recurring feelings of shame, guilt, rage, isolation, and disconnection. Healing is possible. The presenter explores the concepts of trauma-informed practices, healthy coping strategies, and how anyone including teachers, educational staff, peers, clinical staff, and others can recognize the presence and early warning signs of trauma symptoms. Trauma-informed practices seek to change the paradigm from one that asks, “What’s wrong with you?” to one that asks, “What has happened to you?” Handout: PowerPoint

Sandra LaineStill trying to figure out all the available resources for the Arizona Common Core Standards (ACCS)? Don’t even know where to look for those resources? This interactive session will guide participants through a variety of ACCS resources available on the Arizona Department of Education website and beyond.  Resources for special education teachers, general education teachers, administrators, and parents will be identified, navigated, and discussed.  Participants will be able to follow along in this computer lab session. Handout: PowerPoint

2:15 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.  Concurrent Sessions

Marla Guerrero and Della ThompsonRural settings and agriculturally based services provide many benefits for people with disabilities who are transitioning or who may be looking for a long-term home in which to live, work, and grow. Echoing Hope Ranch is a nonprofit organization based in Cochise County, Arizona, that provides residential services, home-based respite and habilitation, and day programs for teens and adults. Echoing Hope’s focus is on autism but the presenters will explore why the agricultural model has so much to offer people no matter the type of disability. The presenters will show how an agricultural program provides productive work and training in a real-world setting; why community collaboration is easy and natural in this setting; how self-esteem, satisfaction, and marketable skills are the end product of this program; and that it is a model that can be individualized for participants in order to address specific needs. By session’s end, participants will be able to identify qualities to look for in a well-run agricultural program and will understand why this option should be at the top of the list for both adult services and for school partnerships in transition programs. Handout: PowerPoint

Nilda Townsend and Kathy Gray-MangersonThis entry-level breakout session will be divided into three segments. In the first segment, participants will be guided through the transition planning process. While exploring the specific elements of the process, participants will be provided with resources to address each element. In the second segment, participants will be presented with two fictional students with varied interests and abilities. Participants will then develop a transition plan for these students. Through this development, participants will better understand age-appropriate assessments, measurable postsecondary goals, annual IEP goals, transition services, and a coordinated set of activities. Finally, participants will be introduced to the AzCIS website and the Blues Directory and be given information on where to get additional resources. They will exit the training with a better understanding of the transition planning process and have the resources to assist them with this vital component of the IEP. Handout: PowerPoint

Audrey TrainorWhile progress toward equitable post-school outcomes has been documented in national studies of transition, students from historically marginalized backgrounds (e.g., those living in poverty) continue to struggle to achieve success in adulthood. This presentation will focus on how to recognize and address diversity and equity issues that are likely to surface during transition planning and instruction. Strategies for culturally responsive transition education, including those appropriate for English learners and their families, will be presented with examples from transition curricula, planning tools, and evidence-based instructional approaches. The focus on outcomes will include employment, postsecondary education, and community involvement. Implications for transition planning and education are target outcomes of the session. Handout: PowerPoint (This session will be repeated immediately following the break.)

Loujeania BostMany schools, districts, and states are making significant gains in boosting high school graduation rates and putting more students on a path to college and a successful career. This progress is often the result of having better data, an understanding of why and where students drop out, a heightened awareness of the consequences to individuals and the economy, a greater understanding of effective reforms and interventions, and real-world examples of progress and collaboration. These factors have contributed to a wider understanding that the dropout crisis is solvable. This session examines the pathway to this transformation and evidence-based strategies that can result in alterable outcomes. Handout: PowerPoint

Harvey RudeThe increasing emphasis regarding the complementary aspects and value of Native and Western ways of learning can address many of the significant challenges that currently exist for Native American students. The following considerations are offered in the spirit of generative change for culturally responsive education that meets the needs of American Indian children and their families in the transition from secondary to postsecondary education: (1) there is a compelling need to develop a definition of what constitutes culturally responsive Native American education that promotes harmony between Native and Western culture; (2) programming approaches for Native American students must be developed in a manner that meets the diversified cognitive, emotional, social, and  physical needs of these learners; (3) teacher education programs are encouraged to include the content and processes of individualization to meet the needs of diverse learners, including Native American students; and (4) ongoing professional development for teachers and other staff who educate Native American students must be provided, with special emphasis on learners who are identified as exceptional (including those with disabilities and gifted/talented), under-served, or educationally disadvantaged. Handout: PowerPoint

Kay Schreiber and John BalentineIn this session, the presenters will examine characteristics of a college-, career-, and civic-ready student and offer strategies and resources to assist with transition. Additionally, the presenters will review Arizona’s new Excellence in Civic Engagement Program, focusing on leadership and support to get schools involved.

Tim Stump and Employer PanelGet inside the minds of employment experts with this panel of representatives from Arizona businesses. These employers will talk about how students can increase their job-seeking success and answer such questions as (1) What types of positions are available at the business? (2) What is the workplace environment like at their business and why is this information important to a job seeker? (3) What interview behaviors will help an individual get the job, and what behaviors will result in losing the job? (4) What employee characteristics are most important to an employer? and (5) What are examples of accommodations offered to employees in the past? Participants will have an opportunity to dialogue with the panel and get answers to their own burning questions.

Charlotte AlversonThis presentation will introduce the State Toolkit for Examining Post-School Success (STEPSS), a FREE web-based, multi-phase process in which stakeholders examine graduation, dropout, secondary transition components of the IEP  and post-school outcomes data; assess progress toward meeting targets in each outcome area listed above; select predictors of post-school success  and develop and implement an action plan designed to improve in-school  secondary transition programs for students with disabilities.

William McQueary and Jeff StuderThe presenters will facilitate an interactive conversation about Indicator 13 (secondary transition IEP requirements), focusing on monitoring requirements and best practices. Participants will be introduced to examples of transition requirements in monitoring and best practices to enhance successful transition postsecondary experiences as well as the provision of free appropriate public education (FAPE) in secondary education. This presentation is intended for beginners and those who choose to refresh their understanding. Handouts: PowerPoint and Case Study (Part II will be offered immediately following the break.)

James MartinGoal attainment is one of the student behaviors associated with postsecondary employment and education. Many students with disabilities lack goal attainment skills and need explicit instruction to learn and apply these skills. Simple technological or other support can facilitate students’ learning and using goal attainment skills. Educators will learn how to teach goal attainment skills to enable their students to attain annual goals. This will involve teaching students to make a plan to attain their goals and then setting up a process to facilitate student action toward attaining goals. The presentation will include an overview of the research related to goal attainment, a detailed description of how to use a goal attainment planning organizer, and suggestions for how teachers can help students maintain their newly learned goal attainment skills. Handout: PowerPoint

Amy Gaumer Erikson
Learn how to infuse transition education schoolwide while addressing Arizona’s Common Core Standards with more than 50 lesson examples illustrating how language arts and mathematics standards can address transition and college and career readiness for all students. Handout: PowerPoint (This is a repeat session.)

Richard LueckingWork is good! Employment is both an intervention and a desired outcome for youth in transition. That is, one of the chief indicators of whether youth have succeeded in the transition from school to adult life, is whether or not they are employed after they exit from school. Post-school employment is more likely to happen when work is included along with other important transition components. With stories and the latest professional consensus on what constitutes optimum transition service, the presenter will share why everyone should presume all youth can be employed and why employers will consider hiring them. Handout: PowerPoint

3:45 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions

Jane SoukupAttend a conference, pick up lots of materials, jot down great ideas, brainstorm with colleagues, make some big plans—then, leave the conference and get swept up in work, unable to find the time to “think through” the conference ideas you want to turn into actions. Sound familiar? Please join this processing session—a way to walk away from the transition conference with plans in hand so that you can decide what is most important for you to do (and how to do it) when you get back to your home turf. The session is for teams, individuals, or people who want to connect with folks in similar roles. The idea is to pull out all the notes, handouts, and “can’t forget this” moments from the conference, consider the needs of your stakeholders and the strengths and needs of your organization, revisit what you liked or disliked about the ideas, and rework the web of information you collected into something practical. The session is facilitated but the majority of the work will be completed by participants. Drinks and snacks will be provided. This is simply a time and means for you to lay out your steps for the 2013–14 school year. 3-2-1 Action!

Debbie Weidinger and Teri BeardsleyWhen youth age out of the public school system, families must learn to navigate the murky waters of the adult system of care. The IEP with its team of teachers and other professionals involved is no longer an option. Each family must seek out the various entities and agencies that service adults, understand the lingo, go through the approval process, and develop a plan to maintain services. This session, in which presenters will describe the services available in Arizona and the basics of social security disability, supplemental security income, and vocational rehabilitation, will target young adults who are not eligible for services from the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD). An introduction to the online resources, AZ Links and Disability Benefits 101, will familiarize participants with these tools. Tips for accessing, understanding, and successfully navigating and organizing these services will be provided, as well as specific strategies to help youth begin to navigate them with supports. Participants will receive a handout with links and descriptions that includes other Arizona agencies and services that provide assistance to young adults. Handout: PowerPoint

Audrey TrainorWhile progress toward equitable post-school outcomes has been documented in national studies of transition, students from historically marginalized backgrounds (e.g., those living in poverty) continue to struggle to achieve success in adulthood. This presentation will focus on how to recognize and address diversity and equity issues that are likely to surface during transition planning and instruction. Strategies for culturally responsive transition education, including those appropriate for English learners and their families, will be presented with examples from transition curricula, planning tools, and evidence-based instructional approaches. The focus on outcomes will include employment, postsecondary education, and community involvement. Implications for transition planning and education are target outcomes of the session. Handout: PowerPoint (This is a repeat session.)

Shelby and Tom NurseThis multi-media workshop explores the lessons learned and the strategies utilized by one family to improve the outcome for their child with special needs.  Shelby Nurse, now a 22-year-old college senior at University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, was born three months premature in 1991, with resulting significant cerebral palsy and visual impairments. Together Shelby and her father, Tom Nurse, will share 10 keys to improving post-school outcomes. An important theme for the entire workshop is to start early, be determined, and have high expectations. This is a keynote you don’t want to miss! Handout: PowerPoint

Richard LueckingA key principle of any sincere employment initiative is the presumption of employability for all people with disabilities. Despite the current economy, the field has the tools to make employment work for all job seekers. This presentation will review some of what we know about effective job development so that optimism, not desperation, guides employment service delivery. Even in a challenging job development climate, anyone who wants to work can obtain employment, regardless of the nature of the disability, regardless of the need for support in finding and succeeding in a job, and regardless of the economic vitality of the community in which the job seeker lives. Handout: PowerPoint

William McQueary and Jeff StuderThis session is Part II of Requirements and Best Practice for Successful Transition Planning. The presenters will facilitate an interactive conversation about Indicator 13 (secondary transition IEP requirements), focusing on monitoring requirements and best practices. Participants will be introduced to examples of the transition requirements in monitoring and best practices to enhance successful transition postsecondary experiences as well as the provision of free appropriate public education (FAPE) in secondary education. This presentation is intended for beginners and those who choose to refresh their understanding. Handouts: PowerPoint and Case Study

William KellibrewAt age 10, the presenter witnessed the killings of his mother Jacqueline and his 10-year-old brother Tony by his mother’s estranged boyfriend. The killer took his own life that day, but not before he made the presenter beg for his life at gunpoint. From suicide attempts, substance use, and other attempts to manage the world, the presenter has become a symbol of hope and resiliency. This session will help participants understand the role that trauma and resiliency has played in a path to healing and recovery. Handout: PowerPoint

Harvey RudeAdaptive leadership is provided as a conceptual guide for the identification of effective strategies that develop teachers as leaders. The traditional response to challenges through the “quick fix” that is readily available to solve technical problems does not work in the context of adaptive challenges that require fundamental shifts in the way teacher leaders think and behave. The concepts of embracing disequilibrium, generating leadership, and taking care of self are illustrated as guides for demonstrating effective teacher leadership to ensure effective transition outcomes. Specific strategies are provided to develop the leadership dimensions of integrity, authenticity, something bigger than oneself, and cause in the matter. Handout: PowerPoint

Amy Gaumer Erikson
Learn how to infuse transition education schoolwide while addressing Arizona’s Common Core Standards with more than 50 lesson examples illustrating how language arts and mathematics standards can address transition and college and career readiness for all students. Handout: PowerPoint (This is a repeat session.)

Desmond Sweet and Joanne SangiorgiA key component in transition planning for youth in secure care is identifying resources in the community that students can connect with in order to reach their post-release goals. WIA is a program designed to assist low-income youth aged 14–21 in developing their academic and pre-employment work maturity skills. Specific WIA programs are available that focus on youth who have court involvement; programs can begin with youth while they are still in secure care by making plans and then helping youth implement their plans once they are released. In order to be eligible for WIA programs, youth must be US citizens or legal residents who meet the income eligibility requirements (receiving food stamps, residing in public housing, proof of low income, living iin foster care) or have an IEP and possess at least one additional barrier (court involvement, basic skills deficiency, pregnant or parenting, lack of work experience). Come learn more about the different WIA programs throughout the state and how to access the services they provide for Arizona’s students. Handout: PowerPoint

5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Reception and Raffle Drawing


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